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New York City Mayor Eric Adams Proposes Housing Asylum Seekers in Private Homes

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New York City Mayor Eric Adams has unveiled a new plan to potentially place thousands of asylum seekers in private residences while compensating local homeowners and landlords.

During a City Hall press conference, Mayor Adams expressed his vision to move beyond housing single migrant men in churches and mosques and explore the option of utilizing private dwellings.

Adams emphasized the potential savings that could be achieved by redirecting the estimated $4.3 billion budget for housing the influx of migrants into everyday houses of worship and private residences, rather than corporate entities. The mayor suggested that recycling local dollars would benefit both the city and its residents.

According to reports from the New York Post, Adams said, “It is my vision to take the next step to this faith-based locales and then move to a private residence.”

“We can take that $4.2 billion — $4.3 [billion] maybe now — that we anticipate we have to spend and we can put it back in the pockets of everyday, everyday houses of worship instead of putting it in the pockets of corporations.”

“We should be recycling our own dollars,” he continued.

Acknowledging potential obstacles, Adams alluded to a “30-day rule” that City Hall would need to overcome. However, he did not provide further details on the rule or the aspects of implementing the plan.

With over 72,000 individuals having arrived in New York City since last spring, the mayor stressed the urgency of finding sustainable housing solutions beyond taxpayer-funded emergency shelters and hotels. The current system, which accommodates approximately 45,000 people, is deemed unsustainable given the continuous influx of migrants.

Adams indicated that the city would seek ways to bypass existing government regulations that prohibit housing homeless individuals in private homes. Additionally, City Hall aims to work with the state legislature to facilitate agreements that bring illegal basement apartments up to code, presenting a more affordable and viable housing alternative.

The estimated cost of the ongoing crisis is expected to exceed the current $4.3 billion budget, particularly as daily arrivals continue to increase. Last week alone, the city registered 2,200 new arrivals. To address cost concerns, Adams’ proposal to house asylum seekers in houses of worship is projected to cost approximately $125 per night, significantly less than the current expenditure of $380 per night in converted hotels.

Mayor Adams’ plan to utilize private residences represents a significant development in New York City’s efforts to address the housing needs of asylum seekers. However, the feasibility and implementation of this proposal, including overcoming legal and logistical challenges, remain to be seen.

Follow Alexander Carter on Twitter @AlexCarterDC for more!

 

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Economy

Gallup poll: Immigration surges to ‘most important problem’ among Americans

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In just the last month alone, Immigration has become the most important problem facing the United States to many Americans, surging from 20% to 28%. “Immigration has now passed the government as the most often cited problem, after the two issues tied for the top position the past two months. The government ranked first each month from January through November 2023″ reports Gallup.

In the latest poll, immigration surpasses all other issues as the most pressing issue (28%); 20% of Americans name the government as the most important problem, followed by the economy (12%) and inflation (11%). Immigration is the only issue that has shown meaningful change in the past month.

The latest results are based on a Feb. 1-20 Gallup survey. Immigration has ranked ahead of all other issues as the most important problem before, having last done so five years ago when there was a surge of attempted border crossings by Central American migrants. Immigration also ranked as the No. 1 problem in July and November 2018 and July 2014.

Gallup started compiling mentions of immigration in 1981. The 28% currently naming immigration as the most important problem essentially ties the 27% reading from July 2019 as the highest in Gallup’s trend.

The latest survey was conducted at a time when a bipartisan group of congressional senators reached an agreement on an immigration reform proposal. The bill ultimately failed to pass a Senate vote, but it faced an uncertain fate in the Republican-led House of Representatives even if it had passed. The House passed a tougher immigration bill in 2023 that the Democratic-led Senate has not taken up and President Joe Biden promised to veto.

The recent bipartisan negotiations took place in response to a record number of border crossings at the southern border in recent months, peaking at over 300,000 in December. An influx of migrants in U.S. cities has also stressed social services there.

Republicans typically are the subgroup most likely to name immigration as the most important problem, and they are largely responsible for the increase in mentions this month. Currently, 57% of Republicans, up from 37% in January, say immigration is the top problem. Independents show a modest uptick, from 16% in January to 22% now, while there has been no meaningful change among Democrats (9% in January and 10% in February).

Residents of the East (36%) and South (31%) are more likely to say immigration is the biggest U.S. problem than are those living in the Midwest (25%) and West (22%). Southern residents have typically been most likely to regard immigration as the top issue.

More See Illegal Immigration as a Critical U.S. Threat

A separate question in the survey finds a record-high 55% of U.S. adults, up eight points from last year, saying that “large numbers of immigrants entering the United States illegally” is a critical threat to U.S. vital interests. The prior high was 50% in 2004.

The vast majority of Republicans already believed illegal immigration was a critical threat; 84% said so a year ago, but the percentage has now reached 90%. A larger increase, from 40% to 54%, has been seen among independents. Far fewer Democrats view illegal immigration as a critical threat, but that percentage is up from 20% in 2023 to 29%.

Continue reading: Gallup.com 

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