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Nevada Man Indicted in Killing of Rapper Tupac Shakur

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In a significant development in the long-standing mystery surrounding the murder of iconic rapper Tupac Shakur, Duane “Keffe D” Davis, a Nevada man, has been indicted on a charge of murder with the use of a deadly weapon. The indictment was officially announced by prosecutors during a court proceeding on Friday.

Chief Deputy District Attorney Marc DiGiacomo disclosed that a grand jury had been convened to investigate the case for several months and that Davis, described as the “on-ground, on-site commander,” had allegedly “ordered the death” of Shakur.

The charges against Davis were unveiled just hours after his arrest while he was on a walk near his residence, according to DiGiacomo. It is worth noting that Davis has been a known figure to investigators.

According to reports, Davis had previously admitted, both in interviews and in his 2019 tell-all memoir titled “Compton Street Legend,” that he was present in the Cadillac during the fatal drive-by shooting of Tupac Shakur in September 1996.

Authorities took action on July 17, raiding the home of the suspect’s wife in Nevada. Video footage from the operation shows law enforcement officers instructing Davis to come out of the residence with his hands raised.

According to reports from Fox News, the search yielded various items, including a Pokeball USB drive, an iPhone, iPads, laptops, a tablet, a desktop computer, external hard drives, copies of Davis’ book “Compton Street Legends,” a Vibe magazine featuring Shakur, and two containers filled with photographs. Additionally, law enforcement sought “notes, writings, ledgers, and other handwritten or typed documents” related to Shakur’s murder.

Tupac Shakur’s murder has remained a high-profile cold case for decades. The prime suspect, Orlando Anderson, who was Davis’ nephew, had previously denied involvement in the shooting before he was murdered in Compton, California, in 1998.

On the fateful evening of September 7, 1996, tragedy struck as Tupac Shakur fell victim to a fatal drive-by shooting. Riding as a passenger in the black BMW owned by Death Row Records co-founder Marion “Suge” Knight, Tupac’s life was abruptly cut short when a white Cadillac pulled up alongside them at a traffic light.

This harrowing event, as detailed by Duane “Keffe D” Davis in a 2018 documentary, revealed that all occupants in the Cadillac that night were affiliated with the South Side Compton Crips gang. Shockingly, it was alleged that the gang sought retribution against Shakur, who had reportedly engaged in a physical altercation with one of its members just prior to the tragic shooting.

Tupac Shakur’s profound influence on the rap community, a legacy that would reverberate for years to come, cannot be overstated. Beyond his lyrical prowess and charismatic stage presence, Tupac’s music and message resonated deeply with a generation. He became a voice for his community, tackling pressing issues in his lyrics and interviews.

Moreover, his authenticity, unflinching honesty, and commitment to addressing the challenges faced by his community cemented his status as an enduring icon in the world of hip-hop. Even in death, Tupac’s impact on the genre and his ability to inspire change in society at large continue to be felt, leaving an indelible mark on the rap community for generations to come.

Tupac Shakur, a prolific rapper and influential figure in the hip-hop industry, was only 25 years old at the time of his death. His fourth solo album, “All Eyez on Me,” continued to dominate the charts with approximately 5 million copies sold, underscoring the enduring impact of his music and the ongoing intrigue surrounding his untimely demise.

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Israel

Military was prepared to deploy to Gaza to rescue U.S. hostages

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The Washington Post released an in-depth report on the intelligence support the United States has provided Israel during its war with Hamas. The assistance has not only helped to find and rescue hostages, but the Post writes it has “also raised concerns about the use of sensitive information.”

The United States provided some of the intelligence used to locate and eventually rescue four Israeli hostages last week, The Post has reported. The information, which included overhead imagery, appears to have been secondary to what Israel collected on its own ahead of the operation, which resulted in the deaths of more than 270 Palestinians, according to Gaza health officials, making it one of the deadliest single events in the eight-month-old war.

Sullivan, the White House national security adviser, stressed that U.S. forces did not participate in the mission to rescue the four hostages. “There were no U.S. forces, no U.S. boots on the ground involved in this operation. We did not participate militarily in this operation,” Sullivan told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday. He noted that “we have generally provided support to the [Israel Defense Forces] so that we can try to get all of the hostages home, including the American hostages who are still being held.”

One critical piece of information from The Post involves a “canceled” U.S. mission to rescue eight Americans:

In October, JSOC forces in the region were prepared to deploy in Gaza to rescue U.S. citizens that Hamas was holding, said current and former U.S. officials familiar with planning for what would have been an exceptionally dangerous mission.

“If we managed to unilaterally get information that we could act on, and we thought we could actually get U.S. people out alive, we could act, but there was genuinely very little information specifically about U.S. hostages,” one official said.

However, the intelligence-sharing relationship between the United States and Israel is not without scrutiny and concern. The Post reports:

In interviews, Israeli officials said they were grateful for the U.S. assistance, which in some cases has given the Israelis unique capabilities they lacked before Hamas’s surprise cross-border attacks. But they also were defensive about their own spying prowess, insisting that the United States was, for the most part, not giving them anything they couldn’t obtain themselves. That position can be hard to square with the obvious failures of the Israeli intelligence apparatus to detect and respond to the warning signs of Hamas’s planning.

The U.S.-Israel partnership is, at times, tense. Some U.S. officials have been frustrated by Israel’s demand for more intelligence, which they said is insatiable and occasionally relies on flawed assumptions that the United States might be holding back some information.

In a briefing with reporters at the White House last month, national security adviser Jake Sullivan said Washington “has provided an intense range of assets and capabilities and expertise.” Responding to a May 11 Washington Post report, Sullivan said that the intelligence is “not tied or conditioned on anything else. It is not limited. We are not holding anything back. We are providing every asset, every tool, every capability,” Sullivan said.

Other officials, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, worry that intelligence the United States provides could be making its way into the repositories of data that Israeli military forces use to conduct airstrikes or other military operations, and that Washington has no effective means of monitoring how Israel uses the U.S. information.

The Biden administration has forbidden Israel from using any U.S.-supplied intelligence to target regular Hamas fighters in military operations. The intelligence is only to be used for locating the hostages, eight of whom have U.S. citizenship, as well as the top leadership of Hamas — including Yehiya Sinwar, the alleged architect of the Oct. 7 attacks, and Mohammed Deif, the commander of Hamas’s military wing. The State Department in 2015 designated both men as terrorists. Three of the eight U.S. hostages have been confirmed dead, and their bodies are still being held in Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

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