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NBC outraged over maskless Florida supermarket-goers

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A video that was taken at a Florida grocery store this week has gone viral after many people in the clip were shown without wearing a mask.

NBC News correspondent Sam Brock entered the store looking to buy a sandwich and “came out with a story” after he captured footage inside of a Naples supermarket this week that has sparked outrage by the mainstream media.

Over 4 million people have viewed the clip since Brock posted it to his Twitter account Wednesday and over 20,000 replies have sparked debate whether masks should be enforced or not.

A “mask exemption” sign posted on the front door of the grocery store states that if customers have a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask, they are exempt and employees cannot legally ask customers about the medical condition.

“Those in our lovely government have ordered all persons entering indoor facilities to wear a mask. If you have a medical condition that prevents you from wearing a mask, you are exempt from this order. Due to HIPAA and the 4th Amendment we cannot legally ask you about your medical condition,” the sign reads.

The sign adds, “if we see you without a mask, we will assume you have a medical condition and we will welcome you inside to support our business.”

Grocery store owner, Alfie Oakes, told NBC’s “TODAY” show he does not believe masks work.

“I know the masks don’t work and I know the virus has not killed 400,00 people in this country,” Oakes said.

“That’s total hogwash,” he added. “Why don’t we shut the world down because of the heart attacks? Why don’t we lock down cities because of heart attacks?”

Oakes filed a federal lawsuit in November challenging the constitutionality of the Collier county’s mask order, the Naples Daily News reported.

Oakes alleged the mandate was being “selectively enforced” and claimed he was being targeted due to his political views, the newspaper reported.

Florida gov. Ron DeSantis said he will not impose a statewide mask mandate, however many Florida counties do have mask requirements. Under a Sept. 25 executive order by DeSantis, local governments are barred from assessing fines and penalties for noncompliance.

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Study finds harmful levels of ‘forever chemicals’ in popular bandage brands

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A new consumer study tested several brands of bandages and found higher levels of fluorine in bandages from Band-Aid, CVS Health, Walmart, Rite Aid, Target and Curad, which contain harmful levels of “forever chemicals,” also known as PFAS.

The study by Mamavation and Environmental Health News revealed that out of 40 bandages from 18 different brands, 26 contained organic fluorine, an indicator of PFAS.

“Because bandages are placed upon open wounds, it’s troubling to learn that they may be also exposing children and adults to PFAS,” said Dr. Linda S. Birnbaum, the study’s co-author and the former director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and National Toxicology Program.

News Nation reports that the study found the chemicals present in the adhesive part of the bandages. Mamavation said some brands likely used the PFAS in bandages “for their waterproof qualities.”

“It’s obvious from the data that PFAS are not needed for wound care, so it’s important that the industry remove their presence to protect the public from PFAS and opt instead for PFAS-free materials,” Birnbaum said.

According to the study, the chemicals are linked to several health effects, including “reduced immune system, vaccine response, developmental and learning problems for infants and children, certain cancers, lowered fertility, and endocrine disruption.”

While the exposure risk to PFAS through the skin isn’t clear, skin exposure “poses similar health risks” as eating or drinking food contaminated with PFAS, according to a previous study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

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