Connect with us

education

Nation’s Education Report Card reveals U.S. has ‘wiped out three decades of gains’

Published

on

School desk

Education Department data released Monday shows our nation’s schools recorded the “largest drop in math scores ever this year, with fourth- and eighth-grade students in nearly every state showing significant declines” reports the Wall Street Journal.

Know as the ‘Nation’s Report Card’ the 2022 National Assessment of Educational Progress, revealed the nationwide plunge in reading “wiped out three decades of gains.”

Low-performing fourth-grade students saw larger declines in both math and reading scores compared with high-performing ones. Black and Hispanic students in the fourth grade saw larger score drops in math than white students. “White students were the only racial group with declines at eighth-grade reading. Gaps in math widened between fourth-grade students who are eligible for free and reduced-price lunches and those who aren’t.”

Federal test results released in September revealed the largest drop in fourth-grade reading scores since 1990 and the first-ever decline in math.

Fordham Institute President Michael Petrilli said the results should serve as a wake-up call for policy makers and school-district officials around the country. “It’s a huge deal,” he said. “We have lost a huge amount of the progress that we have been making over the course of decades and it’s going to take years to catch up.”

The actual numbers are astounding. “Average math scores for eighth-graders in 2022 dropped to 274 out of a possible 500, falling 8 points from 2019. Reading scores declined 3 points, to 260.”

“No state or jurisdiction posted gains in math in either grade, nor did any of the 26 large districts included in the analysis. Utah was the only state where the drop in the eighth-grade math score wasn’t statistically significant. Nationwide, 38% of eighth-graders tested below basic achievement levels in math. The basic level denotes partial mastery.”

Of particular note was the Fourth-grade which had the lowest average reading score. “The tests, administered to U.S. students ages 9 and 13, are regarded as key indicators for student achievement and future trajectory. Achieving reading proficiency by fourth grade is critical because students at that point must use reading to learn other subjects. Math proficiency in eighth grade is one of the most significant predictors of success in high school, educators said.”

Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona said the scores were “a reminder of the impact this pandemic had on our learners” and urged districts to intensify recovery efforts such as tutoring.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

State-by-state comparisons of public-school scores show Massachusetts remained the top performer in most categories while New Mexico earned the lowest scores in every category.

A spokeswoman for the New Mexico Public Education Department said the state is investing in efforts to boost achievement including raising teacher pay.

Los Angeles was the only place—city or state—to show a significant increase in eighth-grade reading. Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said factors including strong attendance for online courses and summer classes contributed to improved reading scores there.

Detroit remained the worst performer in all categories among urban districts, while Cleveland experienced the steepest drops in fourth grade. Cleveland Metropolitan School District CEO Eric Gordon said low school attendance and high numbers of teachers out sick contributed to the drop in scores in the district.

Educators cited different causes for overall declines:

Existing gaps in opportunity and learning experiences between white students and students of color, as well as between well-funded schools and underfunded ones, worsened in the pandemic, National Education Association President Becky Pringle said.

“Collaborative mathematics is extremely important,” Mr. Miller said. “And, yet, when you’re looking at your peer on a screen, you can’t talk to them, because only one person can talk at a time. There’s not a lot of collaboration going on.”

Students struggled with technology during periods of remote learning and were distracted by sickness and economic hardships in their communities, said Arlyssa Heard, a parent organizer for the advocacy group 482Forward in Detroit.

“It was a crazy time,” Ms. Heard said. “I don’t think anyone should be surprised by these test scores.” the 

You may like

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Nation

More than half of top Medical Schools now mandate Critical Race Theory

Published

on

Screen Shot 2021 02 04 at 3.19.19 PM

In a win for the woke warriors who care more about feelings than they do science or medical wellbeing, medical schools are being forced to mandate Critical Race Theory (CRT) training.

According to the Critical Race Training in Education database and reported by the Daily Caller:

Approximately 58 of the top 100 medical schools ranked by the U.S. News & World report include CRT in their courses and student training, according to the Critical Race Training in Education database. Of the top schools, 46 provide students and staff with resources by Robin DiAngelo, the author of “Nice Racism,” a book about how progressive white people perpetuate racial harm, and Ibram X. Kendi, the author of several books on antiracism including “Stamped.”

The Critical Race Training in Education database states, “As with our higher education database, some have embraced CRT explicitly, while others have a continuum of programming, such as ‘antiracism,’ ‘equity,’ and ‘Diversity, Equity and Inclusion’ that does not easily fit into a Yes/No construct…We provide information from which you can make the most informed decision possible.”

The Daily Caller notes that CRT holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches people to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue “antiracism” through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies.

The antiracism push in medical education is increasing; to reach diversity, equity and inclusion goals, 35.6% of medical schools are offering incentives to departments who meet the diversity goals set by the institution. In July, the Association of American Medical Colleges released new guidelines on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives for medical schools to teach students to consider their “privilege” and patients’ “intersectionality” when providing treatment.

The Daily Caller provides a breakdown on some of the nation’s top Medical Schools:

Harvard Medical School, named the top medical school in the country by the U.S. News & World report, is developing new classes for their masters and Ph.D. programs which will help students “acknowledge the ways in which racism is embedded in science and scientific culture and work to redress these longstanding issues,” according to Harvard Medical School’s website. The school’s Global Surgery and Social Change program requires its students to “participate in and lead informed discussions about antiracism through a dedicated antiracism curriculum” in order to educate students on the “history of racism and colonialism in health.”

The University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, ranked third in the U.S. News & World report of medical schools, has racial affinity caucusing groups for students to participate in “antiracist work and process the impact of racism on ourselves and our community,” the school’s website reads. In September 2022, the school announced its “Differences Matter Initiative” to help the school “accelerate the achievement of equity and inclusion across the medical profession.”

Duke University School of Medicine, ranked sixth by the U.S. News & World report of medical schools, implemented an antiracism committee to “incorporate teaching racism and racial inequities” through “teaching, research and clinical missions,” the school website showed. The school offers resources including “an antiracist reading list from Ibram X. Kendi” to help further its goal of making the school “an educational and research leader and agent of change towards an antiracist culture.”

The department of surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, ranked 68th for medical schools in the nation, provides “ongoing faculty development sessions in topics related to diversity, equity and inclusion,” the school website stated. Students in the department of surgery will be taught to “eliminate the impact of implicit and explicit bias” within their practice.

 

 

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC