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More Americans Under 65yrs Died from Alcohol-Related Causes than Those from COVID-19 in 2020

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A new study released findings that more Americans 65-years-old and under died from alcohol-related deaths than COVID-19 in the infamous year of 2020. The study was performed by researchers with the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on Friday.

The National Institute is a division of the National Institutes of Health, or NIH. “Alcohol-related deaths, including from liver disease and accidents, increased to 99,017 in 2020, up from 78,927 the year prior”

While 74,408 Americans ages 16 to 64 died of alcohol-related causes, 74,075 individuals under 65 died of Covid-19, the study found. The rate of increase for alcohol-related deaths in 2020 (25 percent) was greater than the rate of increase of deaths from all causes (16.6 percent).

Lockdowns provide insight into why the largest increase in alcohol-related deaths in 2020 was among younger adults from ages 25 to 44. That age group recorded a whopping almost 40 percent rise over the previous year.

The increase was well above the average annual increase of 3.6 percent in alcohol-related deaths between 1999 and 2019, reports National Review.

The report’s first author, Aaron White, who is a senior scientific adviser at the alcohol abuse institute, told the New York Times that researchers believe there were “lots of people who were in recovery and had reduced access to support that spring and relapsed.” Much of the information came from death certificates. Researches included deaths in which alcohol was listed as an underlying or contributing cause.

“Stress is the primary factor in relapse, and there is no question there was a big increase in self-reported stress, and big increases in anxiety and depression, and planet-wide uncertainty about what was coming next,” he said. “That’s a lot of pressure on people who are trying to maintain recovery.”

 

John Kelly, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the Times that some people were unable or reluctant to seek care during lockdowns and times that hospitals were slammed with Covid-19 cases.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. LongTimeTexan

    March 23, 2022 at 3:06 pm

    More people will eventually die from the covid vaccines than have or will die from covid itself.

  2. Tolerance4

    March 23, 2022 at 4:33 pm

    Wull, that’s just because we were all locked down, due to COVID. There was booze on the shelf. What did you expect?

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China

Human Infection of H3N8 Bird Flu Reported in China

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Will it ever end? On Tuesday this week China’s health authority recorded its first human infection of the H3N8 strain of avian influenza. The variant was identified in a 4-year-old boy from Henan province.

According to a statement from the National Health Commission (NHC) the child raises chickens and crows in his home city of Zhumadian. On April 5 he showed fever and other symptoms, then was admitted to a medical institution five days later for treatment.

The statement indicated while it has been found in horses, dogs, birds and seals around the world, no human cases have ever been reported. Fox News reports the commission “warned the public to avoid contact with sick and dead poultry, as well as live poultry, and pay attention to hygiene.”

In March, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wrote highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been detected in 13 states among commercial and backyard poultry, as well as in wild birds of 14 states.

Fortunately, the agency said H5N1 bird flu poses a low risk to the public.

 

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