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MLB has relocated the All-Star Game to a city with more voter restrictions and less black citizens

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Major League Baseball (MLB) is reportedly planning to relocate the All-Star Game from Atlanta, Georgia to Denver, Colorado in response to voting legislation recently passed in Georgia, sources told the Associated Press.

The MLB Commissioner’s office is expected to declare Tuesday that the Colorado Rockies will host the game.

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box,” said MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred in a statement. He added, “Fair access to voting continues to have our game’s unwavering support.”

Company executives from MLB and other corporations claim the new legislation suppresses voting rights and President Joe Biden told ESPN it’s “Jim Crow in the 21st Century” and that he would “strongly support” moving the game out of Atlanta.

However, the MLB has chosen to relocate the All-Star Game to a state where there are more voter restrictions.

The state of Colorado require proof of identification when casting a ballot to vote and it also has fewer early voting days than Georgia.

Glenn Kessler, a reporter for The Washington Post, analyzed the new Georgia legislation and came to the conclusion that many provisions of the Georgia law make voting more accessible, not less.

Many are now questioning if Commissioner Manfred had read Georgia’s voting laws before deciding to pull the All-Star Game from Atlanta.

The All-Star Game has also been pulled from a city with mostly black citizens and has been relocated to a city with mostly white citizens.

According to U.S. Census data from 2019, Atlanta, Georgia, is 51% black and Denver, Colorado is 9.8% black.

Moreover, The Daily Caller reported that the relocation of the All-Star Game will significantly impact black-owned businesses in Atlanta. Nearly 30% of businesses in Atlanta are black-owned and Georgia will face an estimated lost economic impact of more than $100 million due to the MLB’s boycott of Atlanta, according to the outlet.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declined to throw out the ceremonial first pitch at the Texas Rangers’ home opening game will boycott any other Major League Baseball events after the MLB “adopted what has turned out to be a false narrative about the election law reforms in Georgia,” Abbott wrote in a letter to a top Texas Rangers executive on Monday.

“It is shameful that America’s pastime is not only being influenced by partisan political politics, but also perpetuating false political narratives,” Abbott said, adding that he “will not participate in an event held by MLB, and the state will not seek to host the All-Star Game or any other MLB special events.”

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Biden spends $1.65 trillion taxpayer dollars while vacationing in St. Croix

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Joe Biden

While vacationing in the island of St. Croix for the holidays, President Joe Biden on Thursday signed into law the massive $1.65 omnibus spending package.

The whopping 4,155 pages was supported by only nine House Republicans and 13 Senate Republicans. Majority of criticism from the GOP includes concerns that the bill was rushed and crammed with wasteful spending by a lame-duck Democratic-dominated Congress. The recourse will punish American families by adding to the national debt and exacerbate inflation.

“Today, I signed the bipartisan omnibus bill, ending a year of historic progress. It’ll invest in medical research, safety, veteran health care, disaster recovery, VAWA funding — and gets crucial assistance to Ukraine,” Biden tweeted. “Looking forward to more in 2023.”

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell “praised the bill on the grounds that it represents a real decrease in discretionary spending. He presented it as a positive that nondefense spending jumped by only 5.5 percent, from $730 billion to $772.5 billion, amid an inflation rate of 7.1 percent” writes National Review.

“The bipartisan government-funding bill that Senators Shelby and Leahy have finished negotiating does exactly the opposite of what the Biden administration first proposed,” he said. “This bill provides a substantial real-dollar increase to the defense baseline . . . and a substantial real-dollar cut to the non-defense, non-veterans baseline,” McConnell insisted as negotiations were wrapping up.

House minority leader Kevin McCarthy, however, stated his strong disapproval of the bill before it even advanced. Affirming a letter from 13 House Republicans, McCarthy demanded the bill is reckless, irresponsible, and a “purposeful refusal to secure and defend our borders.”

For example, it failed to incorporate protections for Title 42, the pandemic policy that allows illegal immigrants to be expelled on a public-health basis, which currently hangs in the balance at the Supreme Court.

National Review adds, “The funding in the bill, which averted a federal government shutdown before the new year, includes an allocation of $45 billion in defense assistance to Ukraine. Some Republican priorities, such as Electoral Count Act reform and a bigger military budget, were nested in with Democratic appropriations, such as increased funding for Medicaid and food stamps.”

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