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Immigration

McCarthy: Biden is the migrants’ president

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Kevin McCarthy

Sara Carter interviewed house minority leader Kevin McCarthy on “The Sara Carter Show” podcast Thursday about the border crisis.

McCarthy sent a letter to President Joe Biden on Friday requesting a meeting to discuss the rising numbers of unaccompanied migrant children at the U.S.-Mexico border and has yet to receive a response.

“I sent him the letter asking for a meeting, no response whatsoever,” McCarthy told Carter.

According to McCarthy’s letter, 117,000 unaccompanied alien children will be crossing into the border this year.

At the height of the Obama administration’s unaccompanied minor crisis from 2013, there were over 66,000 unaccompanied minors that were accounted for that year, Carter noted.

“The worst part about this, it’s created by Biden, this is Biden’s border crisis,” McCarthy said. “Had he not reversed the actions of the last administration, we wouldn’t be here today.”

“He’s the migrants’ president, he’s encouraging this to happen,” McCarthy added.

Carter noted that the violence at the border has increased tremendously since Biden took office.

“[Border Patrol agents] actually said the policies that were put in place during the Trump administration mitigated a lot of this of this disaster, especially in the last year of President Trump in office, they noticed a huge decrease because people knew they weren’t going to get away with it,” Carter said.

“It’s unbelievable how quickly the border has become a crisis because of the new administration,” McCarthy said. “100,000 is an unbelievable number, just in that first month. What do we think it’s going to be three months from now?”

McCarthy will be traveling to the border with a committee and is hoping President Biden will meet with him when he returns to discuss solutions to the crisis.

“I hope the President will meet with us when we come back. Because we have solutions for the problems. And we want to make sure our borders secure,” McCarthy told Carter.

McCarthy is urging his fellow Americans to speak up and take action against the new administration’s rules.

“Don’t stay quiet. Speak up right now,” McCarthy said. “Follow what you’re doing and you get educated on it. Call the White House. Call the speaker. Tell them you want action taken on this. You don’t want it to continue to be the way it is.”

“There is a crisis at the border, no matter what the Biden administration is trying to say to you, they are not telling you, the American people, the truth. They’re just not telling you the truth,” Carter said.

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Israel

A new policy by the U.S. Immigration Authority asks Israelis if they were involved in war crimes

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According to attorney Liam Schwartz, head of the Labor and Corporate Immigration Department at the Tel Aviv-based law firm of Goldfarb, Seligman, a new policy by the U.S. Immigration Authority aimed at Israelis seeks detailed explanations about military service, potentially to identify involvement in war crimes or other serious offenses.

“The U.S. Immigration Authority’s new policy is extremely worrisome,” Schwartz said. “Its impact on Israelis could be broad, affecting areas such as relocation for work, academic studies, and family reunification.”

This policy extends beyond green card applications. Israelis applying for visas at U.S. embassies outside Israel may also face rigorous questioning. Y Net News discusses the case of Yuval, a senior manager at a high-tech company in Silicon Valley, who recently received a surprising letter from the U.S. Immigration Authority regarding his green card application. The letter requested detailed information about his service in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) from 2005 to 2008, raising concerns about a potential shift in U.S. immigration policy towards Israeli applicants.

The letter demanded an affidavit under oath addressing several specific questions about Yuval’s military service. These included queries about his participation in combat, command roles, guarding detainees, and the use of weapons or explosives. Yuval must provide satisfactory answers within 87 days to avoid deportation.

Yuval expressed shock at the detailed nature of the questions, noting that he had previously provided basic information about his military service when applying for his work visa two years ago. “I feel as if questions were copied from the Office of the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in The Hague,” he remarked.

While cooperation with U.S. authorities regarding military service is necessary for visa or green card applications, Schwartz highlighted a conflict with Israeli laws on military confidentiality. He suggested that in some cases, it might be more practical for applicants to consider leaving the U.S.

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