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Marjorie Taylor Greene’s Twitter account reinstated after 12-hour suspension

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Controversial GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene‘s (Ga.) Twitter account has been reinstated, Twitter and Greene have confirmed, after it having been temporarily suspended on Friday, which came as House Democrats move to expel her from Congress.

A Twitter spokesperson, in a statement shared with this reporter Friday afternoon, said that the suspension was an automated systems error and Greene’s account has been reinstated.

“We use a combination of technology and human review to enforce the Twitter Rules across the service,” said the spokesperson. “In this case, our automated systems took enforcement action on the account referenced in error. This action has been reversed, and access to the account has been reinstated.”

Twitter, however, did not specify which tweet—or tweets—spurred the suspension of her account, which boasts over 380,000 followers.

Around the same time as the Twitter spokesperson’s statement, Green expressed her anger in a tweet.

“I was just told @Twitter suspended me for 12 hrs in ‘error,’ on the same day Dems introduced a resolution to expel me from Congress,” she wrote. “What a coincidence? Twitter’s little error wasn’t resolved until after 12 hrs. @jack which employee made the “error?” Reply to my email, Jack”.

https://twitter.com/mtgreenee/status/1372958869182382085

The account of the congresswoman, who has previously promoted conspiracy theories and supported calls for violence against Democrats, had been suspended starting around 1 a.m. Friday for allegedly violating Twitter rules, her office later confirmed in a statement prior to her account being reinstated.

According to Greene’s office, the suspension was for 12 hours.

While the account was still suspended, Greene’s office lambasted the social media giant over the temporary suspension, stating the account was censored “without any information from Twitter on the alleged ‘violation.’”

“This move eliminated any possibility for Congresswoman Greene to defend her reputation, her seat, and most importantly the votes of 230,000 Georgians in the 14th District on the Twitter platform,” it also said. “This is yet another attempt by the Silicon Valley Cartel to silence voices that speak out against their far-left woke orthodoxy.”

“It appears that Twitter is assisting Democrats in their attempt to overturn the 2020 election of Congresswoman Greene and silence not only her voice, but the voice of the Georgians who sent her to Congress,” it added.

While she was locked out of her account, her profile page read “we’ve temporarily limited some of your account features” and mentioned that she could still scroll through Twitter but was prohibited from tweeting, retweeting, or liking posts.

This was not the first time she had been locked out of her Twitter account. Back in January, her account was suspended for “multiple violations” of the platform’s civic integrity policy for spreading misinformation.

Greene’s office while the account was locked, according to CNBC, was suspicious about the timing of Twitter’s move, which allegedly happened hours before Democratic Rep. Jimmy Gomez (Calif.) introduced a resolution to remove the Georgia congresswoman from Congress. However, as CNBC noted, there was no immediate evidence to support the suspicions.

“I believe some of my Republican colleagues, and one in particular, wish harm upon this legislative body. And I’m not saying this for shock value,” Gomez said on the House floor Friday morning.

“It’s the conclusion I drew after a member of Congress advocated violence against our peers, the speaker and our government,” Gomez said about Greene, going on to cite statements from her that date back to before she ran for office in 2020 all the way up to the deadly pro-Trump Capitol riot on January 6.

According to CNBC, Gomez spokesman Eric Harris told the news outlet that 72 House Democrats have co-sponsored his single-page resolution, which states that “pursuant to article 1, section 5, clause 2 of the United States Constitution, Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, be, and she hereby is, expelled from the House of Representatives.”

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Minnesota farmer’s lawsuit prompts removal of race and sex-based grant program

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Five months after Minnesota farmer Lance Nistler filed a federal lawsuit with the help of the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), the state has removed race- and sex-based preferences from its Down Payment Assistance Grant Program. This significant policy change followed Nistler’s legal challenge, which highlighted the discriminatory nature of the program’s selection process.

Pacific Legal Foundation writes involvement in Nistler’s case drew attention and criticism from Minnesota progressives. Writing in the Minnesota Reformer, Sigrid Jewett accused PLF of using Nistler “as a pawn in a larger culture war game.” She questioned why a California-based legal firm with numerous Supreme Court victories would be interested in representing a small Minnesota farmer pro bono.

PLF opposes all race- and sex-based preferences in the law, and that’s the real reason the firm chose to represent Nistler. The foundation stands against discrimination in various domains, including government board selections, school admissions, government contracts, and grant distributions, such as in Nistler’s case.

Here are the facts: Minnesota’s Down Payment Assistance Grant Program offers up to $15,000 toward the purchase of farmland. Recipients are chosen through a lottery system. However, before the policy change, even if a recipient was among the first picked through the lottery—as Nistler was, being selected ninth—they could be bumped to the back of the line if they were not a racial minority, female, LGBTQIA+, or otherwise designated as an “emerging” farmer by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Despite being chosen ninth in the lottery, which awarded grants to 68 applicants, Nistler did not receive a grant. He was moved from ninth to 102nd on the waitlist because he is a white male.

Nistler grew up on his family farm, milking cows. “They would lose money every year,” he says of the family operation. After he left for school, his family sold the cows and switched to farming soybeans, oats, and wheat. Lance’s father and uncle now run the farm, but they’re getting older. Lance, who has a degree in electronic engineering and worked in HVAC, is interested in buying a 40-acre chunk of the family farm, becoming the fourth-generation farmer in his family.

The land isn’t just going to be given to Lance. This is a working farm, and the Nistlers aren’t a wealthy family that can transfer land from one generation to the next without consideration. “My dad and uncle, they don’t have 401(k)s or anything,” Lance says. “I mean, the land and the equipment, that’s their retirement. This stuff isn’t given away. I’m not just going to get it handed down to me and inherited. It has to be purchased, and it is not cheap.”

Despite being from a farming family, Lance considers himself a new farmer—he has never owned farmland before, and he has an electronics background. Buying these 40 acres would be a huge step for Lance, planting him firmly in the farming world, which is what Minnesota’s grant program aimed to do. The idea that he would have qualified as an emerging farmer if only his skin were a different color struck Lance as wrong.

“The country we live in, the idea is it’s equal opportunity for everyone,” he says. “And if that’s what it is, then well, why shouldn’t I have the same chances?”

When Lance filed his lawsuit in January, the complaint argued that the discriminatory process violated the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause. The complaint stated:

“Nistler brings this lawsuit to vindicate his constitutional right to equal protection of the law. He brings it to give all Minnesotans a fair chance at a difference-making grant program. He brings it in the hope that he will be able to own that small farm in the near future. He brings it because he is not giving up on his dream.”

In May, after Lance called attention to the unconstitutional policy, Minnesota Governor Tim Walz signed legislation removing the race and sex prioritization from the program. Now, Minnesota will treat farmers equally—as the Constitution promises.

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