Connect with us

Elections

Lacy Johnson: It’s time to ‘bridge the gap’ between our differences in Minnesota

Published

on

lacy johnson vs ilhan omar

The Republican candidate running against Rep. Ilhan Omar in Minnesota, Lacy Johnson, wants to repair the divisiveness in the country by restoring American values back to Minnesota’s fifth congressional district, he said in an interview with “The Sara Carter Show” on Monday.

“We’re trying to bridge the gap between the different components in the community, and we’re trying to do it at the grassroots level because, let’s face it, once you get into the high levels of politics, sowing division, this part of the game plan, dealing with a group identity and put one group against another, it’s part of the game plan. And so that’s why you need people live out here like me, whose main issue is to make people’s lives better no matter what group you’re in that were out for the good of this country,” Johnson told Carter.

Johnson has been endorsed by President Donald Trump for Congress. He told Carter it won’t be easy to win over his district, but as he’s learned from the lessons in his own life: If he puts in the work, there is hope for his community.

“We all for the good of my district, we’re out for the good of the state so we can do it. But it’s a lot of hard work,” Johnson added. “Once again, it is gonna be a tough task, but I have faith in the American people. If we have the grassroots enough information for them to make the decision that they will be able to do that. And we will be a achieve this, But it’s gonna be tough.”

Minneapolis has been a center point for nationwide riots that erupted in the wake of the death of George Floyd. Floyd tragically died in the custody of Minneapolis police officers several weeks ago after a white police officer kneeled on his neck for more than 8 minutes. Since then, violence and looting sprees have wreaked havoc for weeks on local businesses and residences causing hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.

You may like

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

Published

on

Election

New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Join Sara's mailing list to receive the latest stories as soon as they're available!

You have Successfully Subscribed!