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Kudlow Says Americans Can Expect Information On Reopening Economy In ‘Next Day Or Two’

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White House Economic Adviser Larry Kudlow said on Fox Business “Varney and Co.” Tuesday that a plan for re-opening the American economy could be coming “in the next day or two.”

“The President has suggested a kind of rolling re-entry here but I don’t want to front-run his views, I don’t want to pre-announce anything this morning…It’s a question of health, it’s a question of safety and it’s a question of well-being so we can get the (middle class) back to work as soon as we safely can. I believe the country is ready to go back to work,” Kudlow told Varney.

He also acknowledged that the Chinese communist government must face consequences in  covering up the outbreak of the novel coronavirus in Wuhan, which led to the global pandemic.

“China needs to be held accountable on a number of measures,” Kudlow said. “Over a period of time they will be held accountable, no question about that. Having said that, the President is engaging with China. He’s speaking with President Xi, their relationship remains very positive so we are working with them.”

Kudlow mentioned that the administration would like to bring supply chains back to the U.S. in response to what has happened since the start of the pandemic.

“We would like to bring them home, just as a matter of policy across the board…100% expensing, whether it’s structures, plants, equipment, renovations, intellectual property, that would essentially pay the moving expenses for companies to come back to America…and by the way it would also help America to recover even more rapidly from the pandemic,” he said.

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Economy

No help at our border, but Biden announces $5 billion going to bike paths, wider sidewalks

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Screen Shot 2021 04 27 at 3.00.48 PM

In the world of Democrat delusion, they think $5 billion is necessary, at this point in time, to make bike paths and widen side walks. You cannot make this up. They have approved $40 billion in aide to Ukraine in a heartbeat under President Biden, while having rejected former President Trump’s request for a mere $5 billion to secure our border.

The news also comes as fentanyl and the drug overdoses are the number one cause of death in the U.S. There’s also an increase in human smuggling and extortion to pay to cross the border. But no; let’s make some bike paths and widen sidewalks. That is an immediate emergency.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced Monday that money will be used over five years under his department’s new “Safe Streets & Roads for All” program. The $5 billion ini federals funds will be used “to slow down cars chia more speed cameras, carve out bike paths and wider sidewalks and urging commuters to public transit” reports Daily Mail.

“The aim will be to provide a direct infusion of federal cash to communities that pledge to promote safety for the multiple users of a roadway, particularly pedestrians and bicyclists.” The announcement also coincides with the six-month anniversary of President Biden’s infrastructure legislation, and the beginning of the 2022 “infrastructure week.”

The desire to fix roads is a noble one, as “road traffic injuries also are the leading cause of death among young people aged 5-29. Young adults aged 15-4 account for more than half of all road deaths” reports Daily Mail, which adds:

Still, much of the federal roadmap relies on cooperation from cities and states, and it could take months if not years to fully implement with discernible results – too late to soothe 2022 midterm voters unsettled by this and other pandemic-related ills, such as rising crime.

The latest U.S. guidance Monday invites cities and localities to sketch out safety plans in their applications for the federal grants, which are to be awarded late this year.

It cites examples of good projects as those that promise to transform a high-crash roadway, such as by adding rumble strips to slow cars or installing speed cameras, which the department says could provide more equitable enforcement than police traffic stops; flashing beacons for pedestrian crosswalks; new ‘safe routes’ via sidewalks or other protected pathways to school or public transit in underserved communities; and other ‘quick build’ roadway changes designed with community input.

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