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Janice Dean slams Gov. Cuomo over decision to end indoor dining: ‘donate all of the proceeds’ from your book to ‘restaurants you’re closing’

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Friday that indoor dining in New York City will be terminated again as COVID-19 cases in the city’s five boroughs and the rest of the state continue to skyrocket, as well as across the whole United States.

In response to Gov. Cuomo’s order, Fox News’ Janice Dean, who has been a fierce advocate against the New York leader’s handling of the virus suggested he “donate all of the proceeds including the huge advance from your fictional ‘leadership’ book to all the restaurants you’re closing.”

Dean has fought tirelessly to expose Gov. Cuomo’s order at the start of COVID-19 that forced nursing homes to take in recovering patients with the virus. She lost loved ones as a result of that very order.

Because New York City’s number of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations have increased drastically during the past two weeks, the three-term governor stated during a virtual press conference that “[w]e’re going to close indoor dining in New York City on Monday”.

Restaurants, it should be noted, are still permitted to offer take-out, delivery, and outdoor dining options.

This announcement follows a statement from Cuomo earlier this week that, if New York City’s hospitalization rate has not stabilized, indoor dining would either be closed or reduced.

Comparatively, New York City was slower than the rest of the state in loosening its coronavirus restrictions after the initial spring months of the pandemic during which it became the United States’ deadly epicenter. While the city only allowed indoor dining to resume at 25% capacity on September 30, neighboring Long Island’s two counties, for example, began to allow indoor dining back in late June at 50% capacity.

During the previous virtual presser, Cuomo also made a point in calling on the federal government to provide economic relief to businesses affected by the pandemic and the accompanying restrictions, amidst both New York State and City finding themselves economically and fiscally devastated by the virus.

“The federal government must provide relief to bars and restaurants in this next [stimulus] package,” Cuomo urged.

This latest development from Cuomo comes as United States’ total coronavirus death toll surpasses 282,000, according to Johns Hopkins University, with its total confirmed infections climbing well past 15 million.

RELATED: COVID-19: Single-day U.S. virus deaths surpass 3,000

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Biden spends $1.65 trillion taxpayer dollars while vacationing in St. Croix

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Joe Biden

While vacationing in the island of St. Croix for the holidays, President Joe Biden on Thursday signed into law the massive $1.65 omnibus spending package.

The whopping 4,155 pages was supported by only nine House Republicans and 13 Senate Republicans. Majority of criticism from the GOP includes concerns that the bill was rushed and crammed with wasteful spending by a lame-duck Democratic-dominated Congress. The recourse will punish American families by adding to the national debt and exacerbate inflation.

“Today, I signed the bipartisan omnibus bill, ending a year of historic progress. It’ll invest in medical research, safety, veteran health care, disaster recovery, VAWA funding — and gets crucial assistance to Ukraine,” Biden tweeted. “Looking forward to more in 2023.”

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell “praised the bill on the grounds that it represents a real decrease in discretionary spending. He presented it as a positive that nondefense spending jumped by only 5.5 percent, from $730 billion to $772.5 billion, amid an inflation rate of 7.1 percent” writes National Review.

“The bipartisan government-funding bill that Senators Shelby and Leahy have finished negotiating does exactly the opposite of what the Biden administration first proposed,” he said. “This bill provides a substantial real-dollar increase to the defense baseline . . . and a substantial real-dollar cut to the non-defense, non-veterans baseline,” McConnell insisted as negotiations were wrapping up.

House minority leader Kevin McCarthy, however, stated his strong disapproval of the bill before it even advanced. Affirming a letter from 13 House Republicans, McCarthy demanded the bill is reckless, irresponsible, and a “purposeful refusal to secure and defend our borders.”

For example, it failed to incorporate protections for Title 42, the pandemic policy that allows illegal immigrants to be expelled on a public-health basis, which currently hangs in the balance at the Supreme Court.

National Review adds, “The funding in the bill, which averted a federal government shutdown before the new year, includes an allocation of $45 billion in defense assistance to Ukraine. Some Republican priorities, such as Electoral Count Act reform and a bigger military budget, were nested in with Democratic appropriations, such as increased funding for Medicaid and food stamps.”

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