Connect with us

Middle East

Islamic Jihad shows off ‘tunnel city’ for next attack on Israel

Published

on

Screen Shot 2022 04 21 at 11.11.47 AM

Mohammed Raad, the head of the Hezbollah parliamentary bloc in the Lebanese parliament asked for a mere $9 billion to destroy Israel completely. “The resistance only needs $9 billion and there will be nothing left called Israel in the region” he said over the weekend.

Meanwhile, another terrorist organization shows how they too are planning to obliterate the state of Israel. Islamic Jihad gave a media tour in Gaza, where the terror group touted its offensive and defensive tunnel systems.

“In a ‘tunnel city’ under the sandy soils of southern Gaza, Palestinian terrorists are preparing for the next conflict with Israel, as tensions in Jerusalem threaten to escalate” reports the Times of Israel.

The underground tunnels “leave no trace on the surface” and entrances are “discreetly tucked into the foot of a small hill.” The tunnels are also “complete with electric lights, a ventilation system and telecoms cables, the tunnels also have small rooms for storing weapons and ammunition.”

Abu Hamza, Al-Quds Brigade spokesman of Islamic Jihad said “the tunnels have been repaired and the rocket stocks have been replenished” since last year’s war. He also thanked Iran for its support for helping to rebuild and replace its weapons cache.

Another source who asked not to be named, said the terror group has “a large number of offensive tunnels that stretch deep into [Israel] and are linked up to a system of drones.” He also said the group’s rockets are capable of reaching the whole of Israel.

“The rockets are on high alert and we’re waiting for the leadership to decide” said a gunman sitting close to one of the tunnel entrances with a group of gunmen under the trees.

Times of Israel reports on the latest tensions:

Weeks of deadly violence including a series of Palestinian terror attacks in Israel, Palestinian riots and a police crackdown around Jerusalem’s Temple Mount/Al-Aqsa Mosque, and stepped up IDF operations in the West Bank have prompted Islamic Jihad to threaten an escalation.

After two deadly attacks in Tel Aviv and Bnai Brak, the IDF carried out large-scale raids in the West Bank, notably the Jenin area from which the terrorists hailed.

Those operations sparked intense firefights which killed several fighters from Islamic Jihad, which is supported by Israel’s nemesis Iran.

And on Monday evening, a rocket was fired from Gaza into Israel, prompting an Israeli airstrike against a weapons factory.

No faction has yet claimed responsibility, but the incident — the first of its type since January — heightened fears of a further escalation.

Continue Reading
5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Stevarino

    April 22, 2022 at 12:38 am

    The Israelis have equipment to detect these tunnels.They wait till they are full of terrorists and then send them to Allah.

  2. SteveU

    April 22, 2022 at 7:19 pm

    Good thing we are going to give billions more $$ to Iran to ‘slow’their proliferation on nuclear weapons.

  3. Stephane

    April 24, 2022 at 2:04 pm

    small seismic vibrations should take care of that, burying thousands of imbeciles.
    Ask the French Foreign Legionaires on how to do that!
    Iraq’s saddam hussein Guards got the surprise on the Kuwaiti border!

  4. Mark Richardson

    April 28, 2022 at 1:47 am

    The day Iran has a nuclear missile is the day they launch it to Israel.
    And that will be the end of Iran.

  5. Deplorable Joe Voter

    April 28, 2022 at 3:52 am

    It’s nice that they dug their own graves.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Israel

Military was prepared to deploy to Gaza to rescue U.S. hostages

Published

on

Screen Shot 2021 05 14 at 8.23.34 AM

The Washington Post released an in-depth report on the intelligence support the United States has provided Israel during its war with Hamas. The assistance has not only helped to find and rescue hostages, but the Post writes it has “also raised concerns about the use of sensitive information.”

The United States provided some of the intelligence used to locate and eventually rescue four Israeli hostages last week, The Post has reported. The information, which included overhead imagery, appears to have been secondary to what Israel collected on its own ahead of the operation, which resulted in the deaths of more than 270 Palestinians, according to Gaza health officials, making it one of the deadliest single events in the eight-month-old war.

Sullivan, the White House national security adviser, stressed that U.S. forces did not participate in the mission to rescue the four hostages. “There were no U.S. forces, no U.S. boots on the ground involved in this operation. We did not participate militarily in this operation,” Sullivan told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday. He noted that “we have generally provided support to the [Israel Defense Forces] so that we can try to get all of the hostages home, including the American hostages who are still being held.”

One critical piece of information from The Post involves a “canceled” U.S. mission to rescue eight Americans:

In October, JSOC forces in the region were prepared to deploy in Gaza to rescue U.S. citizens that Hamas was holding, said current and former U.S. officials familiar with planning for what would have been an exceptionally dangerous mission.

“If we managed to unilaterally get information that we could act on, and we thought we could actually get U.S. people out alive, we could act, but there was genuinely very little information specifically about U.S. hostages,” one official said.

However, the intelligence-sharing relationship between the United States and Israel is not without scrutiny and concern. The Post reports:

In interviews, Israeli officials said they were grateful for the U.S. assistance, which in some cases has given the Israelis unique capabilities they lacked before Hamas’s surprise cross-border attacks. But they also were defensive about their own spying prowess, insisting that the United States was, for the most part, not giving them anything they couldn’t obtain themselves. That position can be hard to square with the obvious failures of the Israeli intelligence apparatus to detect and respond to the warning signs of Hamas’s planning.

The U.S.-Israel partnership is, at times, tense. Some U.S. officials have been frustrated by Israel’s demand for more intelligence, which they said is insatiable and occasionally relies on flawed assumptions that the United States might be holding back some information.

In a briefing with reporters at the White House last month, national security adviser Jake Sullivan said Washington “has provided an intense range of assets and capabilities and expertise.” Responding to a May 11 Washington Post report, Sullivan said that the intelligence is “not tied or conditioned on anything else. It is not limited. We are not holding anything back. We are providing every asset, every tool, every capability,” Sullivan said.

Other officials, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, worry that intelligence the United States provides could be making its way into the repositories of data that Israeli military forces use to conduct airstrikes or other military operations, and that Washington has no effective means of monitoring how Israel uses the U.S. information.

The Biden administration has forbidden Israel from using any U.S.-supplied intelligence to target regular Hamas fighters in military operations. The intelligence is only to be used for locating the hostages, eight of whom have U.S. citizenship, as well as the top leadership of Hamas — including Yehiya Sinwar, the alleged architect of the Oct. 7 attacks, and Mohammed Deif, the commander of Hamas’s military wing. The State Department in 2015 designated both men as terrorists. Three of the eight U.S. hostages have been confirmed dead, and their bodies are still being held in Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

Continue Reading

Trending