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Innocent Lives Lost: Rioting, Looting and Chaos Continue Nationwide

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David Dorn retired police offier

Eights days of continuing riots throughout the United States, has led to the deaths and injuries of numerous people, including police officers and innocent civilians.

Floyd’s brother, Terrence, has begged the nation to “stop looting and throw up the peace sign.”

Law enforcement officials, along with local and federal authorities, are struggling to gain control of city streets amidst the growing violence. While some people have peaceful intentions and truly want equality for all, others are part of groups like Antifa and seek to create unrest.

In one instance, retired police captain David Dorn, 77, was shot to death by looters outside of a St. Louis, Missouri pawn shop early Tuesday. His killing was broadcast on Facebook Live and is currently under investigation, according to a report in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Dorn was shot in the torso at approximately 2:30 a.m. He died on the sidewalk in front of the shop, Lee’s Pawn & Jewelry, located at 4123 Martin Luther King Drive.

Police have made no arrests and said they have no suspects, the Post-Dispatch reports as of Tuesday at 9:00 p.m. The Ethical Society of Police, an organization that represents black officers in St. Louis, said Dorn was “the type of brother that would’ve given his life to save them if he had to.”

Flowers and a teddy bear sat outside the shop next to a handwritten sign that read, “Y’all killed a black man because ‘they’ killed a black man??? Rest in peace.”

David Dorn dedicated nearly four decades of his life to protecting his community. He retired from the St. Louis Police Department in 2007 after 38 years on the job, starting as a rookie patrol officer in 1969 to becoming a captain. He was the deputy commander of the Bureau of Patrol Support, which is responsible for operating traffic and mounted patrols, commercial vehicles and the tactical unit.

Upon his retirement, Dorn then became police chief in Moline Acres, a small city on the outskirts of St. Louis in which black Americans comprise of over 90% of the population.

A memorial fund for his family has been established.

Tim Fitch, current councilman St. Louis County councilman and a former St. Louis County police chief, remembered Dorn as a “true public servant.”

Moreover, another black officer was killed in riots over the weekend in Oakland, California. A federal officer who was providing security at a U.S. courthouse during a protest was murdered upon someone firing shots from a vehicle.

Dave Patrick Underwood, 53, was fatally wounded and another officer was critically wounded. No one has been arrested.

Underwood and the other individual were contracted security officers employed by the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Protective Service. They were monitoring a nearby protest.

Underwood was the brother of Angela Underwood Jacobs, who recently ran as a Republican candidate for California’s 25th Congressional District seat.

In Davenport, Iowa, police are investigating the deaths of 22-year-old Italia Kelly, who was shot Monday while leaving a protest outside of a Walmart, and of a man, whose body was found near where suspects engaged in a firefight. No arrests have been made.

Her sister released an emotional video, telling those who watched it that Italia was killed by a looter.

Decent Americans all over are begging for the violence to end.

Our leaders have one primary job: to protect their constituents. It’s time for them to do that.

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Nation

Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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