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Increasing number of GOP lawmakers to contest Electoral College vote

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President Donald Trump reportedly met on Monday with several House Republicans to discuss a plan to contest President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College votes as they are certified in Congress Jan. 6. Since then, a number of GOP lawmakers have pledged to contest the results.

Biden is expected to be declared the winner, despite claims of widespread election fraud.

In order to successfully contest the election results, both the House and the Senate need to agree to reject electors, which is unlikely since the House is controlled by Democrats and several Senate Republicans have recognized Biden as the presidential winner.

Trump has continued to support the effort to contest the results, and is joined by many lawmakers.

Texas Rep. Brian Babin said on Twitter Monday that he will object to the results if Congress does not look into the voter fraud allegations. Babin also wrote a letter, signed by 20 Republicans, to congressional leadership demanding action.

“Confidence in our elections must be restored. If Congress doesn’t act, on Jan 6 I’ll object to the electoral college vote submissions on the House floor on behalf of the millions of Americans, myself included, who don’t trust the validity of this election,” Babin wrote.

North Carolina Rep. Ted Budd echoed Babin’s statement, tweeting that he also plans on objecting the results.

Congressman-elect Madison Cawthorn, NC, told a group of young activists this week that he will contest the election “based on constitutional violations by key states.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has urged Republicans not to object during Congress’s count and certification of the Electoral votes, saying it would put fellow GOP senators in a bad position.

Members of GOP leadership warn that the objection will only result in delaying the inevitable outcome.

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Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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Election

New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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