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Iceland ends all COVID Restrictions: ‘As many people as possible need to be infected’ is only ‘route out’

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Iceland will be lifting all COVID-19 restrictions that remain in place. Among them is a 200-person indoor gathering limit and restricted hours for bars. Iceland’s reasoning might leave some puzzled, particularly those of the liberal mindset to shut everything down.

The Ministry of Health said Wednesday that “as many people as possible need to be infected.” In a statement, the ministry said, “widespread societal resistance to COVID-19 is the main route out of the epidemic.”

“To achieve this, as many people as possible need to be infected with the virus as the vaccines are not enough” the statement read, citing infectious disease authorities. “Even though they provide good protection against serious illness.”

In addition to the end of all restrictions, which will go into effect Friday, the border restrictions will also be lifted. Reuters reports Iceland has a population of roughly 368,000 people, and has registered between 2,100 and 2,800 daily infections recently. “More than 115,000 infections have been logged throughout the epidemic and 60 have died due to COVID-19.”

Italy has also announced it will “exit” its COVID state of emergency beginning March 31.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Sad4theUS

    February 24, 2022 at 3:29 pm

    Finally! Good common sense on how to deal with this virus! I’d move to Iceland if it wasn’t so cold…

  2. Doyle James Langford

    February 24, 2022 at 6:03 pm

    Sounds like the truth is going to set them free and if that’s the truth are numbers in the USA have been blown up well over a million people over a million people have died from something else we have a bunch of liars in charge here.

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COVID-19

Watchdog: Pentagon likely rushed denials of COVID-19 vaccine Religious Exemption requests

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The Army only approved just 24 religious COVID-19 vaccine exemption requests out of a total 8,514 requests submitted by active duty soldiers, and  1,602 requests have been rejected while the rest remain pending.

Military.com obtained information showing the Pentagon rushed vaccine exemption denials:

Sean O’Donnell, the Pentagon’s inspector general, wrote in a June 2 memo to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin obtained by Military.com calling attention to a “concerning” trend in which military brass rushed to reject vaccine-exemption petitions rather than giving each request due consideration.

“We found a trend of generalized assessments rather than the individualized assessment that is required by Federal law and DoD and Military Service policies,” he said. “Some of the appellate decisions included documentation that demonstrated a greater consideration of facts and circumstances involved in a request.”

In March, a Texas judge blocked the Navy from dismissing sailors with pending exemption requests and in August, a Florida federal judge ordered class action relief and granted an injunction barring the federal government from enforcing the vaccine mandate for the Marine Corps.

National Review writes, “For the last year, military has been struggling with a recruitment problem. As of July, with only three months left in the fiscal year, the Army had met only 40 percent of its recruitment goal and reduced its active-duty force by 12,000 troops.”

O’Donnell calculated that officials likely gave each appeal a cursory glance rather than a thorough examination, possibly opening the door to litigation from service members who had to resign after they failed to obtain exemptions. Across all the branches, there were about 50 denials per day in a 90-day period, he determined. Over a thousand Coast Guardsmen have already tried to launch a class-action lawsuit in response to their being refused religious exemptions, the publication noted.

“The volume and rate at which decisions were made to deny requests is concerning,” the memo read. “Assuming a 10-hour work day with no breaks or attention to other matters, the average review period was about 12 minutes for each package. Such a review period seems insufficient to process each request in an individualized manner and still perform the duties required of their position.”

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