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Hunter Biden’s memoir sold less than 11K copies in its first week, despite media hype

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Hunter Biden‘s new memoir has failed to land on many readers’ nightstands after one week on the store shelves, selling less than 11,000 copies, recently released numbers show.

His book, “Beautiful Things: A Memoir,” sold 10,638 copies last week, according to Publishers Weekly. This is despite the abundant media promotion from places such as CNN, CBS News, and ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!“—especially about the memoir’s sex and drug content—in the lead-up to the book’s release.

MORE ON HUNTER BIDEN: Hunter Biden says he smoked parmesan cheese because it reminded him of crack cocaine

The book of President Joe Biden‘s youngest son debuted at twelfth place among hardcover nonfiction books. Some notable books that beat Hunter Biden’s memoir include National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman’s “The Hill We Climb: An Inaugural Poem for the Country” in first place with 42,318 copies and Fox News host Shannon Bream’s “The Women of the Bible Speak: The Wisdom of 16 Women and Their Lessons for Today” in second with 32,686 copies during the same timeframe.

His memoir did have a stronger showing on The New York Times’ Best Sellers list though, finishing its debut week in fourth place in the “Combined Print & E-Book Nonfiction” category.

Notably during Biden’s media tour promoting the book, he tried to downplay the significance of his laptop scandal that The New York Post first broke a few weeks before the November 3 presidential election. He told Jimmy Kimmel—for instance—that the laptop is a “red herring,” and falsely claimed to podcast host Marc Maron that a recently published report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence had determined the laptop story to be part of a Russian-backed disinformation operation.

MORE ON HUNTER BIDEN: Hunter Biden falsely claims intel community labeled laptop story as ‘Russian disinformation’

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @DouglasPBraff.

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Elections

BREAKING: Trump ordered to pay over $350M, barred from operating his business in NY in civil fraud case ruling

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Former President Donald Trump and his business empire faced a significant setback as a New York judge ruled against them in a civil fraud case brought by New York Attorney General Letitia James. The 92-page ruling, handed down by Judge Arthur Engoron, barred Trump from operating his business in New York for three years and imposed over $350 million in damages.

The case, which unfolded over months of trial proceedings, stemmed from allegations that Trump inflated his assets and engaged in fraudulent practices. Engoron’s ruling cited a litany of charges, including persistent fraud, falsifying records, issuing false financial statements, and conspiracy to commit fraud.

Moreover, the judge imposed restrictions on key figures within the Trump Organization, including Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, barring them from serving in certain corporate roles in New York for a specified period.

Engoron’s scathing assessment of Trump’s testimony during the trial further undermined the former president’s credibility. The judge criticized Trump for evasive responses and irrelevant digressions, highlighting the detrimental effect on his credibility.

In response to the ruling, Trump’s attorney, Christopher Kise, lambasted the court’s decision, alleging political bias and a disregard for established legal principles. Kise argued that the evidence presented during the trial failed to support the allegations of fraud and emphasized Trump’s substantial net worth.

Kise’s assertions were echoed by Alina Habba, another attorney representing Trump, who denounced the verdict as a “manifest injustice” resulting from a politically motivated witch hunt.

Throughout the proceedings, Trump consistently dismissed the trial as politically motivated, accusing both Engoron and James of partisan bias. His legal team also criticized the absence of a jury in the trial, questioning the fairness of the proceedings.

Attorney General Letitia James, who spearheaded the lawsuit against Trump and his organization, portrayed the ruling as a victory for accountability and transparency in business practices. The lawsuit alleged fraudulent conduct and sought substantial financial penalties, a portion of which would contribute to the state treasury.

The fallout from the case extends beyond Trump and his business interests, with implications for the broader business community and the rule of law. The contentious nature of the trial and its outcome underscored deep divisions and raised questions about the integrity of the legal system.

Trump vows to appeal the decision.

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