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House passes bills expanding background checks for gun sales

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On Thursday, the House of Representatives passed two bills seeking to strengthen background checks on firearm sales and transfers.

Both bills were passed by the House previously but wound up failing. After Democrats regained control of the House following the 2018 midterms, the lower chamber passed both gun-control measures in 2019. However, both died in the Senate when then-Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) refused to schedule votes.

Democrats have lauded the bills as a step in the right direction in combatting gun violence, especially mass shootings. Republicans opposing the bills, however, have argued that both measures would place bureaucratic burdens on law-abiding gun owners without discussing the means through which firearms end up in the hands of those who misuse them.

Despite Democrats now holding a razor-thin majority in the Senate, both bills passed Thursday are unlikely to succeed in surpassing the 60-vote threshold. For it to pass in the upper chamber, they would need to convince 10 GOP senators to defect, assuming all 50 Democrats vote in favor.

The first bill, the Bipartisan Background Checks Act, was approved Thursday in a 227-203 vote with eight Republicans supporting the legislation and a lone Democrat, Rep. Jared Golden (Maine), breaking ranks with his party. Notably, Golden voted similarly the previous day, when he and every single House Republican voted against the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 stimulus package that wound up passing.

RELATED: House approves $1.9T COVID relief bill, Biden set to sign Friday

The measure would implement new background check requirements for gun transfers between private parties.

Moreover, the bill—led by Democratic Rep. Mike Thompson (Calif.)—aims to “utilize the current background checks process” in an attempt to ensure individuals barred from possessing a firearm cannot obtain one.

Right now, unlicensed and private vendors are not forced to conduct background checks for gun transfers—as opposed to licensed firearm sellers, who are required to do so.

The bill would mandates “a licensed gun dealer, manufacturer, or importer” to first take possession of the gun while a background check is being conducted. One exemption the legislation creates, though, is for transfers made as a gift between spouses.

Three Republicans—Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.), Chris Smith (N.J.), and Fred Upton (Mich.)—co-sponsored the bill.

In addition to them, GOP lawmaker who also backed the legislation were Reps. Vern Buchanan (Fla.), Andrew Garbarino (N.Y.), Carlos Gimenez (Fla.), Adam Kinzinger (Ill.), and Maria Salazar (Fla.).

On the same day the House passed the first bill, a second one was also approved. Spearheaded by House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), the Enhanced Background Checks Act—H.R. seeks to shut down the “Charleston loophole.”

Clyburn’s legislation, though, was passed with less support. In a 219-210 vote, Republican Reps. Fitzpatrick and Smith and Democratic Reps. Golden and Ron Kind (D-Wis.) ditched their respective sides of the aisle on the vote.

If ultimately ratified, the bill would extend the review period during which a background check can be conducted before buying a firearm from the current three days to 10.

Clyburn first introduced the legislation following the 2015 mass shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, that saw a white supremacist murder nine Black church-goers.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Trump: Tanks to Ukraine could escalate to use of ‘NUKES’

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Former President Donald Trump stated bluntly on Truth Social,  “FIRST COME THE TANKS, THEN COME THE NUKES. Get this crazy war ended, NOW. So easy to do!”

Trump was referring to the escalation of war in Ukraine. He, like many other commentators and lawmakers, are warning that the decision to continue sending weapons – and now tanks – could potentially lead to the use of “nuclear weapons.”

It’s mission creep and it’s dangerous, they say.

Why? Because Russian President Valdimir Putin has indicated in two different speeches that he would use nuclear weapons to defend Russia, if needed. Those warnings are not just bluster but a very real possibility.

And the escalation of war is visible.

Russia launched 55 missiles strikes across Ukraine Thursday, leaving 11 dead. The strikes come one day after the United States and Germany agreed to send tanks to Ukraine in an effort to aide the country. 47 of the 55 missiles were shot down according to Ukraine’s Air Force command.

Eleven lives were lost and another 11 were injured additionally leaving 35 buildings damaged in the wake of the attacks. According to The New York Times, Denys Shmyhal, said in a post on Telegram. “The main goal is energy facilities, providing Ukrainians with light and heat,” he said.

Ukraine is now demanding that they need F-16 fighter jets. In a post on twitter Ukrainian lawmaker, Oleksiy Goncharenko said, “Missiles again over Ukraine. We need F16.”

The US has abstained from sending advanced jets in the chances that a volatile decision could foster more dangerous attacks like former President Trump’s post on Truth referred to. If the US did authorize the decision to lend Ukraine the F-16 jets Netherlands’ foreign minister, Wopke Hoekstra, would be willing to supply them. According to The New York Times, Hoekstra told Dutch lawmakers, “We are open-minded… There are no taboos.”

F-16 fighter jets are complex to work on, they are not the average aircraft that can be learned in a matter of weeks. It can take months for pilots to learn how to fly these birds. European and US officials have the concern that Ukrainian forces could potentially use the jets to fly into Russian airspace and launch attacks on Russian soil.

Western allies are trying to avoid such a provocation, because that could lead to nuclear warfare in reference to what Putin has said he would do to defend his country.

 

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