Connect with us

Healthcare

High school track coach fired for not enforcing ‘senseless, irrational, cowardice b—s—’ mask mandate

Published

on

Screenshot 2020 03 30 11.39.23

A New Hampshire high school track and field coach was fired after refusing to enforce a mask mandate for athletes that he called “senseless, irrational, cowardice b—s—.”

Pembroke Academy track and field coach Bradley Keyes said the school informed him that athletes would be required to wear masks during all races and the majority of field events during the upcoming spring season.

Keyes argued against the mask mandate in a blog post he published Saturday while encouraging others to tell the school they opposed the policy. He included an email he sent to the school’s athletic director.

The blog post read:

I’ll come straight to the point. I will not put kids on the track and tell them to run any races while wearing masks. I will not stand up in front of the kids and lie to them and tell them that these masks are doing anything worthwhile out in an open field with wind blowing and the sun shining. These insane policies are robbing kids of once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for no valid reason other than irrational fears and going along with the sheep.  … Fire me if you must.

Keyes added that the guidelines were, “Senseless, irrational, cowardice b—s—.”

On Monday, Keyes posted a separate blog post informing readers that he had been fired.

I have been fired. I am not surprised. I made my choice to speak out. They made theirs.

My only regret is not being able to be there everyday to teach and encourage all of my athletes. I have just one parting thought that came to me yesterday that helped clarify this situation and why I made the choice I did.

One of the fundamental parts of all of this is learning to play by the rules. The rules supposedly put in place in order to create a fair and level playing field, to let everyone know what is expected and allowed, and then to let the best man, woman, or team win,” he added. “Except now we are adding arbitrary, senseless, ill-thought rules.

In an interview with WBZ-TV, Keyes said he does not regret his decision to push back against the mask mandate.

“I didn’t give (the school) any real choice. I backed them into a corner. What I wanted was to make a point. I was hoping the word would get out some and maybe there would be enough reaction that down the road, maybe in a few weeks or later, some of the restrictions would be changed. I just think people haven’t pushed back and I decided it was time to push back.”

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

You may like

Continue Reading

Healthcare

TN Republican introduces legislation to fight opioid shipments into U.S.

Published

on

Fentanyl 1031234188 scaled

Tennessee Republican Representative Diana Harshbarger is attempting to fight the opioid crisis and epidemic through new legislation. Introduced Friday, Harshbarger told the Daily Caller:

The Daily Caller first obtained a copy of the legislation, which addresses what Harshbarger calls a “loophole.” The legislation amends the Controlled Substances Act to specifically require registrants to investigate reports of suspicious orders of controlled substances and halt them if necessary. Under the version of the act currently in force, drug manufacturers and distributors are only required to report suspicious orders of opioids and other controlled substances to the DEA.

“Breaking the opioid epidemic’s stranglehold on our nation is one of my foremost priorities. In an effort to do so, my colleagues and I have identified a loophole that allows distributors to continue order fulfillment, even under suspicious circumstances.”

“My bill closes that loophole with the requirements and guardrails needed to ensure these addictive and potentially dangerous drugs do not fall into the wrong hands while the DEA investigates. The future of our nation depends on us solving the addiction crisis, and this is a step towards that outcome” Harshbarger continued.

The Daily Caller reports:

According to a congressional report released in September, the opioid crisis cost the U.S. $1.5 trillion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CDC says 93,331 people died from overdoses in the U.S. in 2020, the highest in 50 years. Opioid-related deaths made up nearly three-quarters of the total.

Pharmaceutical companies have been blamed for contributing to the opioid epidemic. The Department of Justice is currently suing the pharmaceutical company AmerisourceBergen over allegations the company failed to report suspicious orders of opioids to federal law enforcement.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement
-->

Trending Now

Advertisement
-->

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC