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Harvard Reinstates Standardized Testing Requirement for Admissions

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Harvard University announcement it will reverse its test-optional policy and reinstate standardized testing as a requirement for admission. The move has stirred a contentious debate within the academic community. Effective for applicants seeking entry in the fall of 2025, Harvard College will mandate the submission of either SAT or ACT scores, with limited exceptions for circumstances hindering access to these exams.

Hoekstra contends that standardized tests provide crucial predictive insights into a student’s potential for success in higher education and beyond. By reinstating the testing requirement, Harvard seeks to gather more comprehensive data, particularly beneficial for identifying talent across diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.

Proponents of the move, like Harvard Kennedy School’s political economy professor David J. Deming, emphasize the universality of standardized tests, arguing that they offer a level playing field for all applicants. Deming underscores the accessibility of these tests compared to other metrics like personal essays, which may favor privileged students with greater resources.

However, the decision has sparked criticism from those who argue that standardized tests perpetuate inequities in admissions. Critics point to studies, such as those conducted by Harvard economists Raj Chetty and others, which highlight disparities in access to advanced courses and extracurricular opportunities among students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The controversy surrounding Harvard’s policy shift reflects broader concerns within higher education about equity, diversity, and inclusion. While standardized testing may offer a standardized measure of academic aptitude, it also raises questions about its ability to accurately assess a student’s potential in light of systemic educational disparities.

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Leader of the radical pro-Palestine group Manolo De Los Santos arrested in New York

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The head of a radical organization in favor of the Cuban regime and that also openly supports the Hamas terrorist group in New York, was arrested Tuesday after the NYPD evicted an anti-Israel camp at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in Manhattan.

A video posted by The People’s Forum (TPF) on X, formerly Twitter, depicts Manolo De Los Santos, executive director of TPF, an anti-Israel organization that sympathizes with the Chinese Communist Party, was arrested by several NYPD officers wearing riot helmets near the institute’s campus on West 27th Street.

On April 29, more than 100 masked activists met in Manhattan at the office of the TPF, an organization backed by American businessman Neville Roy Singham, a self-proclaimed socialist known for financially supporting left-wing causes, to plan their next moves, while protests Anti-Israel protests reach a fever pitch across the country, reports ADN America.

Manolo De Los Santos urged the group to “give Joe Biden a hot summer” and “make it unsustainable for politics as usual in this country.” Likewise, he asked to recreate “the summer of 2020,” in reference to the violence that besieged major cities in the United States months after the death of Minneapolis man George Floyd, according to the Washington Free Beacon.

A few hours after the meeting was called, dozens of protesters illegally broke into Columbia University’s Hamilton Hall and gained entry through a glass-paneled door that one of those involved broke with a hammer.

Police arrived at the scene after being called by Columbia President Minouche Shafik. In total, 44 people were arrested, including two university staff members and 13 “outsiders” who were not affiliated with the school, Columbia confirmed in a news release Thursday.

The People’s Forum, an organization that describes itself as “a movement incubator for working class and marginalized communities,” has been a mainstay of anti-Israel protests since Hamas’ attack on the Jewish state on October 7, 2023.

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