Connect with us

COVID-19

Governor DeSantis Offers $5k Bonus to Law Enforcement Willing to Relocate to Florida, Vaccinated or Not

Published

on

Appearing on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” with host Maria Bartiromo, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis announced he plans to offer $5,000 signing bonuses to any law enforcement officers who relocate to Florida.

The proposal comes as law enforcement personnel across the country are fighting back against vaccine mandates imposed by liberal leadership. DeSantis says his offer is good for all officers, vaccinated or unvaccinated.

“We’re actually actively working to recruit out-of-state law enforcement. We do have needs in our police and our sheriff’s departments. So, in the next legislative session, I’m going to hopefully sign legislation that gives a $5,000 bonus to any out-of-state law enforcement that relocates in Florida” said DeSantis.

“NYPD [New York], Minneapolis, Seattle, if you’re not being treated well, we will treat you better here. You can fill important needs for us, and we will compensate you as a result” he added. “Nobody should lose their job based off these injections. It’s a choice you can make, but we want to make sure we’re protecting your jobs and your livelihood.”

DeSantis confirmed his position on Monday saying, “we are looking to capitalize off a lot of communities across our country who have turned their back on law enforcement, who aren’t providing them the support.”

Last week DeSantis made headlines after he posted a graphic to his Twitter account playing off the “Don’t Tread On Me” Gadsden flag, with an alligator instead of a timber rattlesnake, and the words “DON’T TREAD ON FLORIDA.” DeSantis’ signature was underneath the phrase.

Over a third of Chicago’s roughly 13,000-member police force has defied the vaccine mandates by not reporting their vaccination status in the government’s database. The Massachusetts state’s police union estimated at least 150 officers will resign over the mandate. The New York City Police Benevolent Association has filed a lawsuit due to the mandates.

Patrick Yoes, president of the National Fraternal Order of Police wrote in a letter to officers, “as an organization that prides itself on protecting the freedoms afforded to us by the U.S. Constitution, we are vehemently opposed to any suggestion of a vaccine mandate from any organization, employer or government agency. “

You may like

Continue Reading
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Jasonn

    November 5, 2021 at 9:25 am

    America needs more thinking leaders like Governor DeSantis.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

COVID-19

Watchdog: Pentagon likely rushed denials of COVID-19 vaccine Religious Exemption requests

Published

on

Afghanistan 676001056

The Army only approved just 24 religious COVID-19 vaccine exemption requests out of a total 8,514 requests submitted by active duty soldiers, and  1,602 requests have been rejected while the rest remain pending.

Military.com obtained information showing the Pentagon rushed vaccine exemption denials:

Sean O’Donnell, the Pentagon’s inspector general, wrote in a June 2 memo to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin obtained by Military.com calling attention to a “concerning” trend in which military brass rushed to reject vaccine-exemption petitions rather than giving each request due consideration.

“We found a trend of generalized assessments rather than the individualized assessment that is required by Federal law and DoD and Military Service policies,” he said. “Some of the appellate decisions included documentation that demonstrated a greater consideration of facts and circumstances involved in a request.”

In March, a Texas judge blocked the Navy from dismissing sailors with pending exemption requests and in August, a Florida federal judge ordered class action relief and granted an injunction barring the federal government from enforcing the vaccine mandate for the Marine Corps.

National Review writes, “For the last year, military has been struggling with a recruitment problem. As of July, with only three months left in the fiscal year, the Army had met only 40 percent of its recruitment goal and reduced its active-duty force by 12,000 troops.”

O’Donnell calculated that officials likely gave each appeal a cursory glance rather than a thorough examination, possibly opening the door to litigation from service members who had to resign after they failed to obtain exemptions. Across all the branches, there were about 50 denials per day in a 90-day period, he determined. Over a thousand Coast Guardsmen have already tried to launch a class-action lawsuit in response to their being refused religious exemptions, the publication noted.

“The volume and rate at which decisions were made to deny requests is concerning,” the memo read. “Assuming a 10-hour work day with no breaks or attention to other matters, the average review period was about 12 minutes for each package. Such a review period seems insufficient to process each request in an individualized manner and still perform the duties required of their position.”

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC