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Gov. Cuomo’s 25k raise will make him the highest paid governor

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Screenshot 2020 04 15 12.43.10

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo will receive a $25,000 pay raise in 2021, despite the state’s $63 billion deficit as a result of revenue losses due to the coronavirus pandemic, The New York Post is reporting.

This will make him the highest paid governor in the nation.

According to a report released by The Commission on Legislative, Judicial and Executive Compensation, judges and lawmakers in the state Senate and Assembly will not be receiving raises due to losses from the coronavirus pandemic.

“Granting raises to public servants is simply not possible at this time,” the commission wrote in the report.

The commission’s decision does not affect Cuomo’s raise, which was approved last year under a joint resolution by the state Senate and Assembly. 

Cuomo will also be receiving additional income this year from his memoir, “American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic,” which was released on Oct. 13.

According to Cuomo, a portion of the sales will go to a coronavirus-related charity.

According to The Times Union of Albany, the state Joint Commission on Public Ethics has been reviewing the approval the agency gave to Cuomo’s book deal.

Commissioner Gary Lavine, a Senate Republican appointee, has questioned whether Cuomo’s commissioners, JCOPE Chairman Michael Rozen and Horwitz, are aware of certain outside income requests, while other commissioners were being left in the dark.

It’s not clear whether the commissioners were aware of Cuomo’s book approval before the publishing deal was announced in August.

New York’s Department of Budget has predicted that the COVID-19 pandemic will likely cause a $60.5 billion loss through fiscal year 2024.

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Biden spends $1.65 trillion taxpayer dollars while vacationing in St. Croix

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Joe Biden

While vacationing in the island of St. Croix for the holidays, President Joe Biden on Thursday signed into law the massive $1.65 omnibus spending package.

The whopping 4,155 pages was supported by only nine House Republicans and 13 Senate Republicans. Majority of criticism from the GOP includes concerns that the bill was rushed and crammed with wasteful spending by a lame-duck Democratic-dominated Congress. The recourse will punish American families by adding to the national debt and exacerbate inflation.

“Today, I signed the bipartisan omnibus bill, ending a year of historic progress. It’ll invest in medical research, safety, veteran health care, disaster recovery, VAWA funding — and gets crucial assistance to Ukraine,” Biden tweeted. “Looking forward to more in 2023.”

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell “praised the bill on the grounds that it represents a real decrease in discretionary spending. He presented it as a positive that nondefense spending jumped by only 5.5 percent, from $730 billion to $772.5 billion, amid an inflation rate of 7.1 percent” writes National Review.

“The bipartisan government-funding bill that Senators Shelby and Leahy have finished negotiating does exactly the opposite of what the Biden administration first proposed,” he said. “This bill provides a substantial real-dollar increase to the defense baseline . . . and a substantial real-dollar cut to the non-defense, non-veterans baseline,” McConnell insisted as negotiations were wrapping up.

House minority leader Kevin McCarthy, however, stated his strong disapproval of the bill before it even advanced. Affirming a letter from 13 House Republicans, McCarthy demanded the bill is reckless, irresponsible, and a “purposeful refusal to secure and defend our borders.”

For example, it failed to incorporate protections for Title 42, the pandemic policy that allows illegal immigrants to be expelled on a public-health basis, which currently hangs in the balance at the Supreme Court.

National Review adds, “The funding in the bill, which averted a federal government shutdown before the new year, includes an allocation of $45 billion in defense assistance to Ukraine. Some Republican priorities, such as Electoral Count Act reform and a bigger military budget, were nested in with Democratic appropriations, such as increased funding for Medicaid and food stamps.”

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