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GOP Rep: SFSU ‘arguably aids and abets terrorists’ at the taxpayer’s expense

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San Francisco State University may have gone without any repercussions for hosting a terrorist at an online event for now, but as a number of top U.S. officials have been alerted to it the issue, that could all change very soon. Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-CO, is working to ensure that there’s an all hands on deck effort and has alerted top U.S. officials to the matter.

In an exclusive interview for SaraACarter.com, Lamborn, who’s alerted Education Secretary Betsy Devos, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Attorney General William Barr, and FBI Director Christopher Wray, to the issue says the event exposes just how easy it is for radical professors to indoctrinate young, impressionable American college students.

Leila Khaled, an avowed terrorist for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a U.S. designated Foreign Terrorist Organization, was responsible for two plane hijackings. The last one of which was in 1970 and she was on board. That time, the terrorist operation was thwarted and she was immediately arrested in the United Kingdom. Later, Khaled was released to Jordan in a terrorist swap.

San Francisco State University, however, saw no problem with Khaled’s ties to terrorism despite the immense backlash. The University, including its President Lynn Mahoney, defended the move. The event was set to occur on Zoom, but the videoconferencing platform quickly rejected the event, Facebook followed with the same action, and minutes into the event, which occurred last month, Youtube cut off SFSU’s feed.

U.S. officials contacted by Rep. Lamborn have yet to respond to the matter, but he tells me he’s optimistic a strong message of condemnation has been made clear to the Unversity.

“We feel like we’re making our point even if they’re slow to get back to us. We want San Francisco State University or anyone else thinking of doing this same kind of thing to know that we’re gonna hold their feet to the fire if they try to host known terrorists and frankly just in an attempt, as I see it, to indoctrinate our youth, our young men and women who are in college who really I don’t think need to be hearing from terrorists,” said Lamborn.

He added, “She [Khaled] is an unrepentant terrorist and that’s no exaggeration. So for San Francisco State University to host her for a Zoom conference… and San Francisco State University, unfortunately, has some radical professors themselves who are fairly out there on the fringes of the hard left and when it comes to anti-Israel activities like this where a person is being hosted who wants to promulgate their views to our youth under the auspices of a publicly funded university, we think that there’s some real problems involved.”

“One problem is that taxpayer dollars are going to this and this is an activity that arguably aids and abets terrorists and that is a violation of U.S. law.” Rep. Lamborn

He added, “So whatever decision they come up with, I want these universities who have radical professors and are going to be doing this kind of activity to know that we’re going to hold their feet to the fire, we’re not going to let this outrageous behavior go on.”

In his letter to Attorney General William Barr and FBI Director Chris Wray last week, Rep. Lamborn suggested University professors involved in coordinating the event with Khaled could be implicated in their supposed crime. When asked by this reporter to explain how those “radical professors” could be held accountable, Rep. Lamborn said it can be done by making the public aware that this is their taxpayer dollars at work.

“Some of it I think is educating the public and letting taxpayers and stakeholders at these various universities know what’s going on, educate them to what the issues are so that they will be moved and motivated to contact the universities also. Universities, on the one hand, they say they want free speech, but on the other hand, they have a responsibility not to put out views that aid terrorism, that glorify terrorism, that could lead to more acts of violence, that could create antisemitism. These are activities that no legitimate university should want to be involved in,” Lamborn explained.

“So we want the universities to know that they’re being scrutinized and they need to exercise good judgement. We want the public to know that these things are going on so that if they have a influence over that university as a taxpayer or a former alumni or something like that or a contributor in the past to make their voices known. Policymakers, lawmakers at the state and federal level need to know this also and then those who are in law enforcement, like the Attorney General and the FBI, they need to know about this as well so that they know there’s a real problem here. There should be no glorification of terrorism.”

Rep. Lamborn was a co-sponsor of the Taylor Force Act to end U.S. aid to Palestinian Authority over its “Pay for Slay” policy, in which families of suicide terrorists receive payment for their deceased relatives carrying out terrorist acts. The legislation was named after Taylor Force, an American veteran and student who was killed by a Palestinian terrorist, while on a college trip to Israel.

“No U.S. dollars or anyone’s dollars for that matter should be going to the Palestinian Authority so that they can turn around and reward terrorists who have been jailed for their attempts to kill or maybe even a successful killing Israelis,” Rep. Lamborn said. “Taylor Force was an American, he wasn’t Jewish or Israeli, he was an American veteran who was visiting Israel as part of his education I believe at Vanderbilt and he was killed by a terrorist who was on a killing spree. And this terrorist was killed, so now the PA is rewarding the family of that terrorist. And were not talking about a few dollars, we’re talking about hundreds of millions of dollars a year and that’s money that really should be going to schools and hospitals and rebuilding society because that’s a very disfunctional society in so many ways. So, that is something we need to hold their feet to the fire also.”

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COVID-19

Adviser to Fauci bragged about helping him evade FOIA, ‘he is too smart’ to get caught

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The House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Pandemic published evidence ahead of a hearing that explains the senior scientific adviser to then-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Anthony Fauci actually bragged about helping Fauci evade the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

The adviser, David Morens, admitted in his own communications to intentionally evading FOIA by using a Fauci’s private Gmail address or just handing him documents in person, according to the newly disclosed emails.

The 35-page report on Morens includes previously unreleased emails including:

An April 21, 2021 email shows Morens contacted EcoHealth Alliance President Peter Daszak, whom Morens has described as his “best friend” and a U.S. taxpayer conduit for the Wuhan Institute of Virology, as well as Boston University and New England Biolabs researchers.

The subject line references “CoV research in China, GoF, etc.,” referring to EcoHealth-facilitated coronavirus research at WIV that could make a virus more transmissible or dangerous. The National Institutes of Health recently admitted it funded gain-of-function research under that definition but not a stricter regulatory definition.

“PS, i forgot to say there is no worry about FOIAs,” Morens wrote. “I can either send stuff to Tony on his private gmail, or hand it to him at work or at his house. He is too smart to let colleagues send him stuff that could cause trouble.”

A May 13, 2021 email to the same recipients referred to “our ‘secret’ back channel” by which Morens connected Fauci to a journalist named “Arthur,” apparently to discuss the feds’ preferred narrative that SARS-CoV-2 emerged naturally rather than via lab leak. The email cited an article on the message board Virological.

Gerald Keusch, associate director of the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory Institute at BU, emailed Daszak Oct. 25, 2021 to relay a phone conversation with “David,” who is “concerned about the privacy of text” and email sent and received on his “government phone” because they “could be FOIA’able.”

“Tony has told him not to be in touch with you and EHA for the time being,” Keusch wrote. Morens relayed that Daszak should get his story straight on EcoHealth’s claim that NIH locked it out of the system when it tried to file its year-five progress report that disclosed an arguable gain-of-function experiment.

Earlier in the day, Morens told Daszak “i will be meeting with Tony about this later on.” The subject line of the thread was “Draft response to Michael Lauer,” deputy director for extramural research at NIH.

Morens also told Daszak that Fauci and then-NIH Director Francis Collins are “trying to protect you, which also protects their own reputations,” apparently meaning against allegations that U.S. tax dollars passed through EcoHealth funded research that may have led to SARS-CoV-2’s emergence.

The subcommittee said it found emails that revealed “likely illegal” practices, including an April 2020 email in which Morens shared a “new NIAID implementation plan” with Daszak and an August 2020 email in which Daszak mentioned a “kick-back” to Morens after NIH awarded $7.5 million to EcoHealth.

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