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GOP Members Speak Out Against COVID Stimulus Package after Trump’s Signature

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President Trump signed the COVID-19 stimulus package Sunday following threats of a government shutdown, which has sparked dissent from his own party members.

In an article published by The Federalist on Monday, U.S. Rep. Chip Roy criticized the bill saying it aids in the “destruction of our republic and way of life.”

“These two bills promote policies that have nothing to do with seeing our fellow citizens through the difficulty of forced school and business closings and limited livelihoods via the force of government, but instead, actively aid in the destruction of our republic and way of life,” Roy wrote.

Roy noted that bill contains a $431 million reduction in funding for ICE beds, the creation and funding of two new politically motivated Smithsonian museums, billions to fund the green climate agenda, $4 billion to fund vaccines in other countries, $82 billion in education funding and additional funding to Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and dozens of other foreign countries.

“President Trump should have never signed this bill, much less threatened a veto only to back away from it. He had supporters waiting in the wings to fight for him and for the American people. Now, the swamp has gotten exactly what it wanted,” Roy said.

“It’s time for Congress to do its job. That means reading, debating, and amending legislation — before we vote on something.”

During a private conference call of House Republicans on Wednesday, lawmakers complained about “pork” projects in the bill.

Rep. Kevin McCarthy said the bill had been tainted, The New York Times reported.

“I don’t know if we recover from this,” said Representative Virginia Foxx, Republican of North Carolina, according to three officials on the call. “We will have a hell of a time getting this out of people’s head.”

Representative Don Bacon, Republican of Nebraska, said Mr. Trump had thrown House Republicans under the bus, according to a person on the call.

Trump initially didn’t sign the $900 billion aid package, arguing that Congress needed to increase the size of relief checks from $600 to $2,000, but after threats of a government shutdown, Trump signed off on the bill late last night.

Trump criticized the $1.4 trillion government funding bill that was attached to the COVID relief bill, calling it “reckless spending” at a time when federal resources should be focused on the economic recovery in the U.S.

“It’s called the COVID Relief Bill but it has almost nothing to do with COVID,” Trump said in a taped video posted to his Twitter account. “This bill contains $85.5 million for assistance to Cambodia, $134 million to Burma, $1.3 billion for Egypt and the Egyptian military.”

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1343068648118874113

“Congress found plenty of money for foreign countries, lobbyists and special interests, while sending the bare minimum to the American people who need it,” Trump said.

Trump said he will not sign the bill until Congress amended the bill and increased the $600 stimulus to $2,000 and removed the “wasteful and unnecessary items.”

The nearly 5,600-page bill passed the House and Senate by overwhelming margins Monday night.

The bill authorizes direct checks of $600 for people earning up to $75,000 per year and an additional $600-per-child stimulus payment.

The bill also creates a new $300 weekly unemployment supplement and replenishes a forgivable loan program for small businesses. It includes protections against evictions and money for COVID-19 vaccine distribution and cash-strapped transit systems.

Trump announced that the House of Representatives will vote Monday to increase “payments to individuals from $600 to $2,000 and that a family of four would receive $5,200.”

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NYC bill trying to repeal ‘sanctuary city’ laws put in place by liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio

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New York lawmakers are introducing a bill this week to undo “sanctuary city” laws approved from 2014-2018 under then-Mayor Bill de Blasio, a Democrat. Council members Robert Holden (D-Queens) and Joe Borelli (R-Staten Island) told The New York Post they’ll introduce the bill Thursday.

Among the laws to be reversed include the prohibiting of the NYPD, and Correction and Probation departments from cooperating with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents unless the cases involve suspected terrorists or serious public safety risks. It would also reverse rules prohibiting city agencies from partnering with ICE to enforce federal immigration laws.

“Sanctuary city laws put all New Yorkers, both immigrants and longtime residents, in danger by preventing the NYPD and DOC from working with ICE,” said Holden, a moderate Dem. “We do not need to import criminals, and only 23 years since 9/11, we have forgotten the deadly consequences of poor interagency communication. We must repeal these laws immediately.”

“Like most things in New York, sanctuary city policy is a social experiment gone off the rails,” said Borelli. “All the problems with these local laws came out during the public-hearing process, but the Council just stepped harder on the gas pedal.”

In February, Mayor Eric Adams called for the rules to be loosened so migrants “suspected” of “serious” crimes could also be turned over to ICE — as they once were under sanctuary city policies implemented as early as 1989 under ex-mayors Ed Koch and Michael Bloomberg.

Among public reasons for the push is the murder of Georgia nursing student Laken Riley.  If it wasn’t for the sanctuary city policies, Riley is among other deaths that could have been prevented if the policies were not in place, Holden and other critics have said.

The 22-year-old was found dead Feb. 22 on the University of Georgia’s campus, six months after her alleged killer Jose Antonio Ibarra, 26, was arrested in Queens and charged with endangering a child.

The Post explains of the case:

The NYPD had no choice but to cut the Venezuelan-born Ibarra loose — instead of turning him over to federal immigration officials — because he didn’t have any major crime convictions.

Council Speaker Adrienne Adams shot down the mayor’s idea just one day later, saying she and the rest of the Council’s progressive Democratic majority wouldn’t be considering any rule changes. The bill introduced this week is also likely to face objections from the Council’s left-wing Democratic majority.

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