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Google ‘MONOPOLY’ slammed by Justice Department in Anti-Trust lawsuit

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The Justice Department slammed Silicon Valley tech giant Google Tuesday in a much anticipated anti-trust lawsuit that claims the technological behemoth monopolizes the Internet and shuts out competitors.

The case was filed in the federal court in Washington, D.C., and alleges, among many issues, that “Google’s practices are anticompetitive under long-established antitrust law. Almost 20 years ago, the D.C. Circuit in United States v. Microsoft recognized that Google’s practices are anticompetitive under long-established antitrust law.”

Moreover, the lawsuit shows that “Google is a limited liability company organized and existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, and is headquartered in Mountain View, California.” These revelations are important because “Google engages in, and its activities substantially affect, interstate trade and commerce. Google provides a range of products and services that are marketed, distributed, and offered to consumers throughout the United States, in the plaintiff States, across state lines, and internationally.”

Google is so dominant that ‘Google’ is not only a noun to identify the company and the Google search engine but also a verb that means to search the internet.

Justice Department AntiTrust Suit On Google

Justice Department officials note in the antitrust suit that although Google was the “darling of Silicon Valley” two decades ago that company no-longer really exists.

“The Google of today is a monopoly gatekeeper for the internet, and one of the wealthiest companies on the planet, with a market value of $1 trillion and annual revenue exceeding $160 billion,” the antitrust suit states. “For many years, Google has used anticompetitive tactics to maintain and extend its monopolies in the markets for general search services, search advertising, and general search text advertising—the cornerstones of its empire.”

Google’s chief legal officer Kent Walker told The Wall Street Journal in a statement that “people use Google because they choose to—not because they’re forced to or because they can’t find alternatives. Like countless other businesses, we pay to promote our services, just like a cereal brand might pay a supermarket to stock its products at the end of a row or on a shelf at eye level.”

However, the Justice Department’s lawsuit points out that Google doesn’t leave any room for completion.

As for the anti-trust suit, the DOJ revealed that Google’s exclusionary agreements cover just under 60 percent of all general search queries. But get this, the show evidence, that the other half of “the remaining queries are funneled through Google owned-and- operated properties (e.g., Google’s browser, Chrome).

Therefore, “between its exclusionary contracts and owned-and-operated properties, Google effectively owns or controls search distribution channels accounting for roughly 80 percent of the general search queries in the United States. Largely as a result of Google’s exclusionary agreements and anticompetitive conduct, Google in recent years has accounted for nearly 90 percent of all general-search-engine queries in the United States, and almost 95 percent of queries on mobile devices.”

In September of last year, over forty Forty state attorney generals signed onto an antitrust investigation of Google. It was one of the biggest investigations into a corporation in modern times and it relied on former Google employees, turned whistleblowers, say it is an imperative step in the right direction.

In August 2019, Google former senior engineer turned whistleblower, Zachary Vorhies,  came forward.  He told SaraACarter.com and Project Veritas’s James O’Keefe that Google created algorithms to hide its political bias within artificial intelligence platforms. What he said was that the company targeted particular words, phrases and contexts in an effort to promote, alter, reference or manipulate perceptions of Internet content. SaraACarter.com was able to verify that Vorhies delivered roughly 950 pages of documents to the Department of Justice’s Antitrust division in August.

“It’s pretty big and they have all the data I have given them and I’m sure they have been going through it,” said Vorhies on Monday. “I feel first off a bit of relief because this is exactly what I exactly what would happen.”

Vorhies said the state attorney generals “need to look at Google bias in real time news feeds. It appears that Google gives certain media companies special access to actually bias the news results towards establishment players in the political field. This is dangerous because this effects not just the big political races but likely can effect smaller political state races.”

Vorhies said he “hope’s what comes of this is that the government is going to start digging using the information I provided as a starting point for electronic discovery. Just to show the impact I believe this is happening.”

Vorhies, and other whistleblowers like him, have certainly opened up Pandora’s box on the tech giants.

Like the Justice Department lawsuit alleges it appears that the Google monopoly “has thus foreclosed competition for internet search. General search engine competitors are denied vital distribution, scale, and product recognition—ensuring they have no real chance to challenge Google.”

“Google is so dominant that “Google” is not only a noun to identify the company and the Google search engine but also a verb that means to search the internet,” the antitrust suit states.

You can follow Sara A. Carter on Twitter @SaraCarterDC.

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CO leaders stating they won’t use any city money to support migrants or to alleviate the crisis in Denver

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In February 2018, Denver city leaders sent a valentine to foreigners interested in relocating to the progressive mountain city and a message to any elected officials looking to stop them:

Draped on Denver’s City and County building was a large, blue banner: “Denver ❤️ Immigrants.”

Then-mayor Michael Hancock event posted on social media that it was a statement of “love” to let immigrants know that Denver is “an open and welcoming city.” However, six years later, Denver residents are facing an uphill battle of repercussions from the liberal leaders’ actions. Amid a crisis that has seen more than 40,000 migrants arrive in the city since late 2022, Denver leaders have a new message: If you stay in Denver, you will suffer.

“The opportunities are over,” an official with new mayor Mike Johnston’s office told a gathering of migrants in Spanish inside a city shelter in late March, according to a video obtained by a local television station. “New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more.”

On Monday, Douglas County filed a lawsuit against the state of Colorado and its Democratic governor Jared Polis in Denver District Court over the issue.

The lawsuit is challenging the constitutionality of two state laws passed by Democrats in the Colorado legislature: a 2019 law that restricted the ability of local law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration officials in civil cases, and a 2023 law that prohibits local governments from entering or renewing detention agreements with ICE and that prohibits them from funding immigration detention facilities owned or operated privately.

“The nation is facing an immigration crisis. The nation, the state, and local governments need to cooperate and share resources to address this crisis,” the lawsuit states, adding that the 2019 and 2023 laws in question “prohibit the necessary cooperation and create dangerous conditions for the State and migrants.”

Teal contends that “the state doesn’t have the inherent authority to limit the ability of a local jurisdiction to work with any agency, regardless be it local, state, or federal.” By doing so, he said, “the state is inhibiting the local communities, the local jurisdictions from providing for the safety” of their residents.

“We are seeing what is going on in Denver, and we do not want that coming here to Douglas County. It is not safe,” Douglas County commissioner Lora Thomas, a former state trooper, said during a Monday morning press conference announcing the lawsuit.

Douglas commissioner Abe Laydon said on Monday that the lawsuit “is about putting America first and about putting Coloradans first.” As a Latino, he said, he recognizes “the plight of those seeking refuge and asylum here in the United States,” but he added that “Douglas County is a place where quality of life comes first.”

National Review reports on the mile-high city’s crisis:

In January, the city was housing and feeding almost 5,000 migrants, mostly Venezuelans, in hotel shelters. Other migrants slept in tents on sidewalks and in parking lots, adding a new wrinkle to Denver’s ongoing struggles with panhandling and squalid homeless camps.

At intersections throughout Denver, migrants with water bottles and squeegees head into traffic to try to make a few bucks washing drivers’ windshields.

To address a migrant-driven financial crunch, the city is now cutting hours at local rec centers, slashing park programming, and freezing hiring in some departments. To save a little money, the city has decided against planting flowers in some of its parks and medians this spring.

The migrant crisis has cost the Denver region at least $170 million, according to a conservative estimate by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, which looked at city spending as well as school and hospital costs, and is almost surely an undercount.

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