House Judiciary Committee Republicans went head to head with Chairman Jerrold Nadler Monday, as his agenda to target President Donald Trump for impeachment they say is based on no evidence of wrongdoing and is solely political.



Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) didn’t waste a moment with the five minutes he was given to speak. He reminded John Dean, former White House counsel to Richard Nixon, who testified Monday of his conviction for obstructing justice during the Watergate investigation.

He shot back at convicted felon Dean, who was attempting to show the “remarkable parallels” between Watergate and the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Gohmert didn’t buy Dean’s comparison regarding “obstruction” but instead listed a litany of other similarities between Watergate and Russiagate.

Watergate & Russiagate 


“There are similarities – you’re right, with regards to Watergate: in both, an administration was seeking to illegally spy on another candidate. In both, people were hired to attempt to gather evidence that can be used against a candidate,” Gohmert said. “In Watergate the committee to re-elect the president hired burglars to break into the DNC headquarters. In Watergate administration officials tried to find ways to use federal dollars to pay for their criminal spying.”

“In Russiagate members of the federal government used the intel, DOJ, FBI communities to attempt to defeat a presidential candidate, when that failed to have him removed from office. In Russiagate, the Clinton campaign and the FBI paid a former foreign agent to collude with Russia to produce opposition research that turned out completely false as the Mueller report indicated and used to commit a fraud upon the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) court and get multiple warrants to spy on an opposition campaign…”

Gohmert then ends his statement by stressing the dangers faced by Americans at this critical time. He said it’s shocking that lawmakers, mainly Democrats, who once fought for the Fourth Amendment are now failing hold those accountable for weaponizing the intelligence community, politicizing institutions and abusing the Constitution.

“We are in a greater danger for our Constitution at this time than we were from the outside of World War II,” he said.