Former DNI reveals satellites show UFOs engaged in action that can’t be explained

Former Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe revealed to Fox News host Maria Bartiromo Friday that the United States intelligence and military apparatus has been monitoring Unexplained Aerial Phenomena (UAP), commonly known as UFOs, engaging in action that current technology cannot explain.

The admission is stunning, as Ratcliffe is the highest level former U.S. official to disclose the possibility that advanced intelligence may exist outside our planetary system. His revelations also come on the heels of a report that will be submitted to Congress on the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAPs), anytime between now and June 1. The demand for the report was included in the COVID-19 relief and Omnibus bill, which gave the agencies 180 days to turn over their findings to congress.

“There are a lot more sightings than have been made public,” said Ratcliffe to Bartiromo.

“Some of those have been declassified. And when we talk about sightings, we are talking about objects that have seen by Navy or Air Force pilots, or have been picked up by satellite imagery that frankly engage in actions that are difficult to explain,” he continued. “Movements that are hard to replicate that we don’t have the technology for. Or traveling at speeds that exceed the sound barrier without a sonic boom.”

It isn’t unexpected to hear more officials speaking out about the phenomenon, as it was just several months ago that the Pentagon released three declassified videos of unidentified shaped Tic-Tok shaped objects traveling at extraordinary speeds that were captured by Navy aircraft cameras with infrared observation capability. Those objects – captured on info-red – sometimes are caught accelerating at incredible speeds with G-forces that no human body can withstand.

Luis “Lue” Elizondo, the former director of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (ATTIP), the secretive Pentagon unit that studied UFOs, told me Sunday that Ratcliff’s statements “further illustrates the reality of what other senior members of our Executive and Legislative Branches are already aware of, in that the UAP/UFO issue is real, relevant, and a national security interest.”

According to the Senate Intelligence Committee, the disclosure report must include “observed airborne objects that have not been identified.”

Moreover, the lawmakers request the following:

1. A detailed analysis of unidentified aerial 
        phenomena data and intelligence reporting collected or 
        held by the Office of Naval Intelligence, including 
        data and intelligence reporting held by the 
        Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force;

          2. A detailed analysis of unidentified phenomena data 
        collected by:
            a. geospatial intelligence;
            b. signals intelligence;
            c. human intelligence; and
            d. measurement and signals intelligence;

          3. A detailed analysis of data of the FBI, which was 
        derived from investigations of intrusions of 
        unidentified aerial phenomena data over restricted 
        United States airspace;

          4. A detailed description of an interagency process 
        for ensuring timely data collection and centralized 
        analysis of all unidentified aerial phenomena reporting 
        for the Federal Government, regardless of which service 
        or agency acquired the information;

          5. Identification of an official accountable for the 
        process described in paragraph 4;

          6. Identification of potential aerospace or other 
        threats posed by the unidentified aerial phenomena to 
        national security, and an assessment of whether this 
        unidentified aerial phenomena activity may be 
        attributed to one or more foreign adversaries;

          7. Identification of any incidents or patterns that 
        indicate a potential adversary may have achieved 
        breakthrough aerospace capabilities that could put 
        United States strategic or conventional forces at risk; 
        and

          8. Recommendations regarding increased collection of 
        data, enhanced research and development, and additional 
        funding and other resources.
    The report shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may 
include a classified annex.

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