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Former Afghan interpreter says he feels ‘betrayed by the West’

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By Jenny Goldsberry

An anonymous Afghan interpreter blasted the Biden administration for betraying him and other Afghans like him. He made an appearance on CNN Tuesday, while protecting his identity for safety.

“To be honest with you, all the Afghans, including me and everybody, we are feeling that we were actually betrayed by the West,” the interpreter told host Jake Tapper. “Working with the U.S. and the West, we worked with them, we were betrayed by them.”

Meanwhile, the country is being invaded by the Taliban. “We are invaded by Pakistan and we are ignored by the United Nations,” the interpreter said. As a result, they point the finger at the U.S. government. “So we are blaming everybody. I do blame the Afghan government as well for not talking to the people, for not telling what was going on. But we are blaming the West a lot for what’s been going on in Afghanistan.”

The segment is CNN’s latest effort in criticizing the Biden administration over the fallout in Afghanistan. Earlier this week, CNN’s editor at large Chris Cilliizza wrote a scathing op ed on the president. According to him, “the situation was totally and completely out of control.” Then, the network featured a segment comparing President Biden’s previous predictions and promised compared to the current situation.

Political pundit Dinesh D’Souza tweeted out a link to the segment, calling it a “devastating takedown of Biden presidency.” However all the negative coverage doesn’t seem to sway Biden, who is reportedly currently on vacation. He briefly paused his trip to double down on his decision to withdraw in a press conference.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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Russia launches surveillance satellite for Iran for ‘agricultural, environmental, and scientific purposes’

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Iran nuclear weapons program

In the latest partnership between Iran and Russia, Roscosmos Corporation, a Russian state-owned company, “launched an Iranian photographic satellite from its Vostochny Cosmodrome using a Soyuz rocket” reports The Foreign Desk. The surveillance equipment is expected to send high-resolution pictures from 500 km above the earth’s surface, and state media in Iran says it will generate images for agricultural, environmental, and scientific purposes.

This is not the first time Iran has found friends in ‘high places’. In 2022, Russia assisted Iran with the launching of a remote-sensing Khayyam satellite from a facility in Kazakhstan. Iran’s Telecommunications Minister, Issa Zarepour, portrayed the project as “fully domestically developed.”Since Russia began its invasion of Ukraine in 2022, Iran and Russia have worked together to mitigate the numerous international sanctions that have been levied against their governments.

“Tehran has sent ballistic missiles, attack-drones, and battlefield munitions to assist Moscow’s military operations against Ukrainian forces. Russia has reciprocated with the transfer of military aircraft and advanced technical support” reports The Foreign Desk.

Shortly after the Biden administration and members of the United Nations allowed preventive sanctions to expire earlier this year, Iran sent hundreds of ballistic missiles to Russia, reportedly in return for fighter jets and helicopters from Moscow.

“The U.S. and European partners declined to prevent the expiration of U.N. sanctions in late 2023 that curbed Iran’s ability to transfer missiles” reports The Foreign Desk.

 

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