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Fmr. Uighur camp detainees speak about their experiences: ‘Their goal is to destroy everyone’

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This story was first published by The Dark Wire Investigation Foundation

According to a recent report by the BBC, women in China’s “re-education camps” for Uighurs have been systematically raped, sexually abused and tortured.

Tursunay Ziawudun spent nine months inside China’s interment camp in the Xinjiang region.

Ziawudun said once the women arrived, camp guards would pull off their headscarves and long dresses – religious expressions that became illegal for Uighurs that year.

Ziawudun said she shared a cell with 30 other women and they used a single bucket for a toilet.

The first two months they were forced to cut their hair and watch propaganda programs about Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Camp guards started interrogating Ziawudun and quickly became violent.

“Police boots are very hard and heavy, so at first I thought he was beating me with something,” she said. “Then I realized that he was trampling on my belly. I almost passed out – I felt a hot flush go through me.”

When Ziawudun started bleeding, the guards said, “it is normal for women to bleed.”

Ziawudun recalled masked men coming into their cell after midnight to choose women they wanted and bring them to a “black room,” where there were no surveillance cameras.

The first time it happened, Ziawudun remembered hearing screaming.

“As soon as she went inside she started screaming,” Ziawudun said. “I don’t know how to explain to you, I thought they were torturing her. I never thought about them raping.”

“The girl became completely different after that, she wouldn’t speak to anyone, she sat quietly staring as if in a trance,” Ziawudun said.

“There were many people in those cells who lost their minds.”

Several nights, Ziawudun said, they took her.

“They did whatever evil their mind could think of,” Ziawudun said in tears. “They didn’t just rape. They were barbaric.”

“Perhaps this is the most unforgettable scar on me forever.”

Some of the women who were taken from the cells at night never returned. Those who did come back were threatened against telling others in the cell what happened to them.

“You can’t tell anyone what happened, you can only lie down quietly,” she said. “It is designed to destroy everyone’s spirit.”

Ziawudun said the women were forcibly injected every 15 days with a “vaccine” that caused nausea and numbness.

Camp detainees had to comply with pregnancy checks, forced contraception, sterilizations or abortions.

Ziawudun was released in Dec. 2018 and was granted safe refuge by the U.S.

She currently lives in a suburb outside of Washington D.C. with a landlady from the local Uighur community.

A week after she arrived in the U.S., she had surgery to remove her womb because of injuries she suffered from being stomped on.

“I have lost the chance to become a mother,” she said.

Ziawudun waved her right to anonymity and now feels free to speak out about the full extent of the abuse.

It’s estimated that over a million Uighurs and Muslims are held inside the camps, which China says exist for the “re-education” of the Uighurs and other minorities.

Ghulzira Auyelkhan was detained in the camp for 18 months and worked as a cleaning lady.

She said Chinese men would pay money to have their pick of the “pretty, young inmates.” Auyelkhan was forced to strip Uighur women naked and handcuff them to their beds, before leaving them alone with Chinese men. Afterwards, she cleaned the rooms.

In a statement, the Chinese government said the camps in Xinjiang were not detention camps but “vocational education and training centers.”

The Chinese government “protects the rights and interests of all ethnic minorities equally,” the statement continued, adding that the government “attaches great importance to protecting women’s rights.”

“It is very obvious their goal is to destroy everyone and everyone knows it,” former camp detainee Tursanay Ziyawudun said. “They say people are released, but in my opinion everyone who leaves the camps is finished.”

Click here to read the original report on TheDarkWire.com

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Husband of Biden’s Commerce Secretary is Top Executive at Firm Funded by Chinese Government

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Gina Raimondo
Gina Raimondo

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo has a conflict of interest. She must work with her agency to combat and counter China on the world stage, all while supporting her husband’s position as a top executive for an artificial intelligence company whose major venture capital firm investor Is backed by the Chinese government.

Danhua Capital is based in California and is financially backed by the Chinese Communist Party. They are also one of the main funders of PathAI, an artificial intelligence firm that employs Raimondo’s husband, Andy Moffit. Moffit acts as the chief people officer.

The Chinese firm lists PathAI as one of its featured “biotech and health” investments on its website, although it’s unclear how much specifically Danhua Capital has invested. According to a 2018 Reuters report on the firm, Danhua Capital was established and funded as part of the Chinese government’s “penetration of Silicon Valley.”

In 2018, the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) testified before Congress that Danhua Capital’s mission is to use capital to narrow the technology gap between China and the United States. The Washington Free Beacon reports that many staffers from CNAS, a liberal think tank, are now employed in the highest ranks of the Biden administration.

The Washington Free Beacon reports:

The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday that Raimondo’s agency was pushing back on efforts by others in the Biden administration to block Chinese technology firms from working with American companies. Commerce officials are arguing internally, according to the report, that the administration’s tougher approach to China would hurt U.S. companies.

Raimondo said on Thursday she would not urge U.S. companies to pull sponsorships from the upcoming Beijing Olympics after President Joe Biden announced a diplomatic boycott of the games over human rights abuses. “What individual companies do is entirely up to them,” Raimondo said. “We’re not going to pressure them one way or another.”

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