Connect with us

China

Fmr. Uighur camp detainees speak about their experiences: ‘Their goal is to destroy everyone’

Published

on

uighur

This story was first published by The Dark Wire Investigation Foundation

According to a recent report by the BBC, women in China’s “re-education camps” for Uighurs have been systematically raped, sexually abused and tortured.

Tursunay Ziawudun spent nine months inside China’s interment camp in the Xinjiang region.

Ziawudun said once the women arrived, camp guards would pull off their headscarves and long dresses – religious expressions that became illegal for Uighurs that year.

Ziawudun said she shared a cell with 30 other women and they used a single bucket for a toilet.

The first two months they were forced to cut their hair and watch propaganda programs about Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Camp guards started interrogating Ziawudun and quickly became violent.

“Police boots are very hard and heavy, so at first I thought he was beating me with something,” she said. “Then I realized that he was trampling on my belly. I almost passed out – I felt a hot flush go through me.”

When Ziawudun started bleeding, the guards said, “it is normal for women to bleed.”

Ziawudun recalled masked men coming into their cell after midnight to choose women they wanted and bring them to a “black room,” where there were no surveillance cameras.

The first time it happened, Ziawudun remembered hearing screaming.

“As soon as she went inside she started screaming,” Ziawudun said. “I don’t know how to explain to you, I thought they were torturing her. I never thought about them raping.”

“The girl became completely different after that, she wouldn’t speak to anyone, she sat quietly staring as if in a trance,” Ziawudun said.

“There were many people in those cells who lost their minds.”

Several nights, Ziawudun said, they took her.

“They did whatever evil their mind could think of,” Ziawudun said in tears. “They didn’t just rape. They were barbaric.”

“Perhaps this is the most unforgettable scar on me forever.”

Some of the women who were taken from the cells at night never returned. Those who did come back were threatened against telling others in the cell what happened to them.

“You can’t tell anyone what happened, you can only lie down quietly,” she said. “It is designed to destroy everyone’s spirit.”

Ziawudun said the women were forcibly injected every 15 days with a “vaccine” that caused nausea and numbness.

Camp detainees had to comply with pregnancy checks, forced contraception, sterilizations or abortions.

Ziawudun was released in Dec. 2018 and was granted safe refuge by the U.S.

She currently lives in a suburb outside of Washington D.C. with a landlady from the local Uighur community.

A week after she arrived in the U.S., she had surgery to remove her womb because of injuries she suffered from being stomped on.

“I have lost the chance to become a mother,” she said.

Ziawudun waved her right to anonymity and now feels free to speak out about the full extent of the abuse.

It’s estimated that over a million Uighurs and Muslims are held inside the camps, which China says exist for the “re-education” of the Uighurs and other minorities.

Ghulzira Auyelkhan was detained in the camp for 18 months and worked as a cleaning lady.

She said Chinese men would pay money to have their pick of the “pretty, young inmates.” Auyelkhan was forced to strip Uighur women naked and handcuff them to their beds, before leaving them alone with Chinese men. Afterwards, she cleaned the rooms.

In a statement, the Chinese government said the camps in Xinjiang were not detention camps but “vocational education and training centers.”

The Chinese government “protects the rights and interests of all ethnic minorities equally,” the statement continued, adding that the government “attaches great importance to protecting women’s rights.”

“It is very obvious their goal is to destroy everyone and everyone knows it,” former camp detainee Tursanay Ziyawudun said. “They say people are released, but in my opinion everyone who leaves the camps is finished.”

Click here to read the original report on TheDarkWire.com

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

You may like

Continue Reading

China

U.S. Commerce Department: Chinese firms are supplying Russian entities

Published

on

GettyImages 1238675143 scaled

On Tuesday, the United States Commerce Department said several companies in China are supplying Russia’s military. The announcement was made alongside a “new round of blacklist restrictions for foreign firms aiding Moscow’s war against Ukraine” reports National Review.

“These entities have previously supplied items to Russian entities of concern before February 24, 2022 and continue to contract to supply Russian entity listed and sanctioned parties after Russia’s further invasion of Ukraine,” stated an official Commerce Department notice posted to the Federal Register.

“Commerce also blacklisted several Chinese companies and Chinese government research institutes for their work on naval-technology and supplying Iran with U.S. tech in a way that harms America’s national security” adds National Review.

Six companies that are helping further the Russian invasion are also based in Lithuania, Russia, the U.K., Uzbekistan, and Vietnam.

National Review reports:

The Commerce Department stopped short of blaming the Chinese government for the sanctions-evasion activity it identified today. Commerce secretary Gina Raimondo previously said that there doesn’t appear to be any “systemic efforts by China to go around our export controls.” The Biden administration has publicly and privately warned Beijing against supporting the Russian war, with White House officials even leaking to the press about an effort to present China’s ambassador in Washington with information about Russian troop movements ahead of the invasion.

While Beijing has not expressed outright support for the invasion, it has used its propaganda networks to back Moscow’s narrative. Meanwhile, top Chinese and Russian officials have moved to solidify the “no-limits” partnership they declared in early February. General secretary Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin held a call this month, marking the construction of a new bridge between their two countries, during which they reiterated their support for the burgeoning geopolitical alignment.

National-security adviser Jake Sullivan said last month that the U.S. has no indications that Beijing has provided Russia with military equipment. A Finnish think tank, the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air, estimated on June 12 that Chinese imports of Russian oil since the outset of the conflict have amounted to $13 billion, making China the biggest consumer of the country’s oil exports. Previously, it was Germany. “While Germany cut back on purchases since the start of the war, China’s oil and gas imports from Russia rose in February and remained at a roughly constant level since,” the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission noted.

Official advisor Anton Gerashchenko tweeted incredible video of Ukrainian soldiers sweeping through fields, writing “this is how our fields are de-mined so that farmers can harvest crops.”  On Monday a Russian missile struck a mall in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, where over 1,000 civilians were inside.

“Almost two dozen people were still missing Tuesday one day after a Russian airstrike struck a Ukrainian shopping mall and killed 18 civilians inside…On top of the 18 dead and 21 people missing, Ukrainian Interior Minster Denis Monastyrsky said 59 were injured. Several of the dead were burned beyond recognition” reported the New York Post.

 

 

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC