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War on Drugs

Florida to be paid $860 as settlement of opioid epidemic lawsuit

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CVS and pharmaceutical companies are to pay Florida a combined $860 million as part of the settlement for an opioid epidemic case, state officials announced Wednesday. Florida began filing “thousands of lawsuits against companies that make and distribute the drugs” in 2010, reports abc News.

The lawsuits were seeking to hold the pharmaceutical companies accountable for the opioid epidemic which has been linked to over 500,000 deaths in the United States over the past two decades.

The death count includes those from prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and generic oxycodone as well as illicit drugs such as heroin and illegally produced fentanyl. A “handful” of cases have gone to trial, with may settling out of court, particularly over the last year.

Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody announced CVS Health Corp and CVS Pharmacy Inc. will pay the state $484 million, Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd. agreed to pay $195 million and Allergan PLC more than $134 million.

“The opioid epidemic is wreaking havoc on Florida families,” Moody said in a news release. “The monies secured from CVS, Teva, Allergan and Endo will help further our efforts to remediate the harm and suffering of Floridians.”

The money from CVS, Moody added, will be divided between the state and Florida cities and counties, which were beset by opioid overdoses and illicit drug use during the “pill mill” epidemic of a decade ago. The money must be spent on tackling the opioid crisis.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Duane Mo tez

    March 30, 2022 at 6:31 pm

    Foolish Foolishness

  2. Phil Dufault

    March 31, 2022 at 5:51 pm

    Well I believe more of the ODs are a result from what comes through the wide open Southern Borders and air and sea from Cucia.

    • AntiCommies

      April 5, 2022 at 7:20 pm

      With Dems idiotic open border policy, why regulate any drugs?

  3. Roger Berry

    April 7, 2022 at 4:03 am

    You need a few more ZEROS in the headline !!!!!

  4. Sher

    April 7, 2022 at 7:02 pm

    I just find it odd too, that CVS is another WEF contributor along with all the pharmaceutical companies on their list of supporters. Why should they be trusted to say they care. Klaus Swabb’s side kick is out and pretty blunt saying too many people, useless beings and mocking God. Even said humans are hackable and now tracking under the skin. Now how can that happen? We need billboards with names and places to find that information.

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Immigration

Thousands of pounds of meth seized from vegetable shipments in one week from one border location

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers seized large quantities of methamphetamine this month alone at just one cargo facility located in Otay Mesa, California. Law enforcement officials warn that this month’s thousands of pounds of meth were smuggled in none other than vegetables.

A shipment of peppers and tomatillos being driven by a 27-year-old male with a valid border crossing card driving a commercial tractor-trailer was stopped by CBP officers, reports The Center Square:

At first glance, the shipment appeared to contain only peppers and tomatillos. But after a K-9 unit screened it, officers examined the trailer and found a box containing a crystal-like substance. Additional officers were radioed to provide assistance and began extracting package after package hidden under the produce. They found 3,594 packages that were tested and identified as methamphetamine. The stash totaled 3,671.58 pounds.

At the same facility and in the same week CBP officers uncovered another massive load of meth being smuggled inside a shipment of carrots. The Center Square reports:

They stopped a 44-year-old man, also a valid border crossing card holder, driving a commercial tractor trailer hauling a shipment manifested as carrots. Officers unloaded the cases of carrots and found suspicious packages hidden underneath, which were tested and identified as methamphetamine. Overall, they seized 574 packages weighing approximately 2,900 pounds.

In both instances, the meth and commercial tractor-trailers were seized; the drivers were turned over to Homeland Security Investigations.

The Center Square writes that Mexican cartels for decades have devised creative ways to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S., including “task saturation” and “migrant warfare,” according to authorities. Surging resources in one area to leave the border open in another area enables cartel operatives and gangs they work with to commit a range of crimes. Another tactic is hiding people and drugs in trucks, including behind or under produce, to bring through ports of entry.

 

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