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First radio signals from planet outside solar system could have been detected, astronomers say

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Perhaps the universe is trying to send Earth a message.

Astronomers might have received the first radio signals from a planet outside of our solar system, The Independent‘s Andrew Griffen reported Thursday.

The breakthrough, according to the scientists who found it, could pave the way for an important new means of examining and understanding far-flung planetary bodies.

This news is the latest in otherworldly stories reported this year relating to UFOs and little green men. That they aren’t the more memorable stories from this year goes to show how bizarre the 2020 news cycle has been.

RELATED: UFO sightings up 283% in NYC from 2018

RELATED: WATCH: Pentagon Releases US Navy Footage of UFOs, Confirms The Videos Are ‘Real’

However, researchers indicate that more specifically the aforementioned radio signals are originating from an exoplanet, marking the first time humans have ever collected a radio emission from another planet outside of our own neighborhood, the United Kingdom-based publication reported. In particular, the radio bursts are emanating from the constellation Boötes, which can be viewed in the northern sky.

“We present one of the first hints of detecting an exoplanet in the radio realm,” said Jake D. Turner, a postdoctoral researcher at Cornell University who helped spearhead the study, the findings of which are reported in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

“The signal is from the Tau Boötes system, which contains a binary star and an exoplanet,” Turner added. “We make the case for an emission by the planet itself. From the strength and polarization of the radio signal and the planet’s magnetic field, it is compatible with theoretical predictions.”

Furthermore, in order to verify the origin of the bursts, additional research must be conducted. However, if it is the case, then it will offer a completely new way to understand worlds that are many light years away, according to The Independent.

By utilizing a radio telescope in the Netherlands, the astronomers discovered the bursts. They located signals emanating from a star system that is a host to a variety of planet known as a hot Jupiter, which is massive and gaseous like Earth’s neighbor but much closer to its own system’s star, per The Independent.

“If confirmed through follow-up observations,” explains Ray Jayawardhana, a Cornell professor and a co-author on the new research, “this radio detection opens up a new window on exoplanets, giving us a novel way to examine alien worlds that are tens of light-years away.”

If scientists are able to analyze radio signals from far-away worlds, they could use them in order to understand their magnetic field, according to The Independent. Consequentially, that would help them discover what the properties of its interior and its atmosphere are, as well as the interactions between stars and planets–all of which could be used to understand how habitable it might be.

This latest research arose from work the team conducted in the past to examine our neighbor Jupiter, and extrapolate to understand how it might look if viewed from up to 100 light-years away, The Independent reported. That gave them the pattern that might show if a similar planet was found elsewhere–which they now believe to have done.

It should be noted, though, that the signal is still weak and unconfirmed, per The Independent. Additional examination using other radio telescopes should help provide more details and finally confirm whether or not the enigmatic bursts are really originating from another planet outside our solar system.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Cuomo says he’ll ‘fully cooperate’ with NY AG’s review of sexual harassment claims

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said Wednesday that he will “fully cooperate” with the state attorney general’s independent review into sexual harassment allegations made against the currently scandal-ridden governor, saying, “I fully support a woman’s right to come forward.”

Last Wednesday, Lindsey Boylan, who served in his administration for over three years, accused Cuomo of suggesting to her on a 2017 flight that they play strip poker, inappropriate touching, and kissing her on the lips without her consent.

RELATED: ‘Let’s play strip poker’: Fmr. Cuomo aide accuses NY governor of sexual harassment

Following Boylan’s accusations, 25-year-old Charlotte Bennett alleged the governor indicated interest in having an affair with her while she was serving in his administration as a health policy adviser. In a Saturday New York Times report, Bennett told the newspaper that Cuomo asked her if she had “ever been with an older man,” adding that “age doesn’t matter” in relationships.

At Wednesday’s press briefing, the Empire State governor addressed the accusations leveled against him over the past seven days by three women and New York Attorney General Letitia James’ (D) independent review into those claims, which she announced on Monday was formally proceeding.

RELATED: De Blasio ‘sickened’ by Cuomo sexual harassment claims

“As you probably know, the attorney general is doing an independent review, and I will fully cooperate with that review,” Cuomo said at the beginning of his statement. “Now, the lawyers say I shouldn’t say anything when you have a pending review until that review is over. I understand that, I’m a lawyer, too. But, I want New Yorkers to hear from me directly on this.”

“First, I fully support a woman’s right to come forward,” the governor began. “And I think it should be encouraged in every way. I now understand that I acted in a way that made people feel uncomfortable. It was unintentional and I truly and deeply apologize for it. I feel awful about it, and frankly I am embarrassed by it, and that’s not easy to say. But that’s the truth.”

This echoes what Cuomo said in a Sunday statement about the allegations, in which he stated he “may have been insensitive” during his tenure but charged his accusers of misinterpreting his actions, saying, “I acknowledge some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation… I am truly sorry about that.”

RELATED: Cuomo responds to sexual harassment claims, saying he ‘may have been insensitive’

During his Wednesday remarks, Cuomo iterated “I never touched anyone inappropriately,” repeated that sentence, then said “I never knew at the time that I was making anyone feel uncomfortable” and repeated that one too.

“And I certainly never, ever meant to offend anyone or hurt anyone or cause anyone any pain. That is the last thing I would ever want to do,” he continued. “I ask the people of this state to wait for the facts from the attorney general’s report before forming an opinion. Get the facts, please, before forming an opinion.”

“I also want you to know that I have learned from what has been an incredibly difficult situation for me as well as other people, and I’ve learned an important lesson,” the governor said at the end of his statement. “I’m sorry. I’m sorry for whatever pain I caused anyone, I never intended it, and I will be the better for this experience.”

Amid Boylan and Bennett’s allegations, another report of Cuomo sexually harassing a woman has cropped up. On Monday, a woman named Anna Ruch accused the governor of placing his hands on her cheeks—without her consent—at a 2019 wedding reception and asking if he could kiss her. A photograph of the two together at the event has also been circulating on social media.

RELATED: ‘Eat the whole sausage: Gov. Cuomo in hot water for resurfaced video

Asked at Wednesday’s briefing about the pictures that have resurfaced of him being touchy with people, particularly that of him and Ruch, the governor claimed that it is his way of greeting people.

“I understand the opinion of—and feelings of—Ms. Ruch,” Cuomo said. “You can find hundreds of pictures of me making the same gesture with hundreds of people—women, children, men, etc. You can go find hundreds of pictures of me kissing people. […] It is my usual and customary way of greeting.”

Moreover, the governor said that his father, former Gov. Mario Cuomo, would do the same thing.

“By the way, it was my father’s way of greeting people,” Cuomo said, explaining, “You’re the governor of the state, you want people to feel comfortable, you want to reach out to them.”

He also mentioned that he kisses and hugs legislators and noted that at an event in Queens the other day he hugged pastors and state assembly members.

Furthermore, the governor said that his intent “doesn’t matter,” saying, “What it matters is if anybody was offended by it.”

“But if they were offended by it, then it was wrong,” he added, going on to say that if they were offended or hurt by it, he apologizes.

MORE ON CUOMO: NY dem says state legislature is ‘inching toward’ Cuomo impeachment probe

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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