Connect with us

Elections

Federal judge throws out GOP Georgia lawsuit that aimed to remove absentee ballot drop boxes

Published

on

Screen Shot 2020 08 04 at 4.01.15 PM

On the third day into early voting for Georgia’s side-by-side U.S. Senate runoff elections, a federal judge Thursday dismissed a case brought by Republicans that sought to scrap absentee ballot drop boxes, Fox News reports, saying that fraud concerns at this stage in the runoffs are “highly speculative.”

In the United States District Court for the Southern District of Georgia, centered in Augusta, a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit brought by the 12th Congressional District Republican Committee. The plaintiffs had no standing, the judge said, and also saying that courts shouldn’t alter election rules so close to an election, according to Fox News.

Both of Georgia’s January 5 races are key to Democrats and Republicans post-2020 election political efforts. If Democrats sweep both seats, they would have 50 of the 100 seats in the Senate and have Vice President-elect Kamala Harris as the tie-breaking vote, which would make confirming President-elect Joe Biden‘s Cabinet nominees easier for them. On the other end, Republicans want to maintain their slim majority, fearing that Democratic victories in the Peach State could allow for Biden to successfully appoint officials farther to the left of the Democratic establishment.

GEORGIA RUNOFFS: Rev. Warnock allegedly ‘extremely uncooperative’ during 2002 child-abuse investigation, police records reveal

While absentee voting has been happening for a couple of weeks in the state, early in-person voting at polling stations commenced on Monday. More than 900,000 Georgians have already voted in the dual races, according to the state’s latest data, with 427,000 of those votes being cast through absentee ballots.

The thrown-out case alleged that procedures used to process absentee ballots during November’s general election–such as signature matching and ballot drop boxes–could open the door for widespread fraud in the runoffs, Fox News reports.

On top of that, the lawsuit also asked that local election officials be forbidden from opening ballot envelopes prior to January 5. Additionally, per Fox News, the suit also sought to discredit guidance from the Secretary of State’s Office on the correct way officials needed to verify signatures on absentee ballots.

Chief Judge Randall Hall, who was nominated to the federal bench by Republican President George W. Bush, found the plaintiff’s allegations of voter fraud “highly speculative.”

“I have real concerns about whether this court […]should even entertain this action at this point,” said Hall. “[…]Fraud concerns at this stage are all highly speculative.”

“We are not even on the eve of an election,” Hall said in striking down the case. “We are, as it relates to this particular election, closing in on halftime.”

This case is the latest in a series of failed attempts from Republicans to challenge the election results and rules in key swing states after November 3. Despite a massive but doomed lawsuit being thrown out of the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday and the Electoral College officially elected Biden to be the next president, President Donald Trump refuses to concede and continues to allege that widespread election fraud occurred, repeatedly claiming that the election was stolen.

RELATED: McConnell congratulates Biden on election victory, draws criticism from some conservatives

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

You may like

Continue Reading

Elections

Oklahoma passes bill banning majority of abortions from ‘moment of fertilization’

Published

on

Screen Shot 2022 05 26 at 12.01.19 AM

Oklahoma’s Republican Governor Kevin Stitt signed a bill into law on Wednesday which bans virtually all abortions “from the moment of fertilization.”

“I promised Oklahomans that as governor I would sign every piece of pro-life legislation that came across my desk and I am proud to keep that promise today. From the moment life begins at conception is when we have a responsibility as human beings to do everything we can to protect that baby’s life and the life of the mother,” Stitt said in a statement. “That is what I believe and that is what the majority of Oklahomans believe.”

The state legislature first approved the bill, which goes into effect immediately, last week. It bans abortions from the moment of fertilization, except for in cases where rape or incest occurred, or where the mother’s life is in danger.

The law also allows for private citizens to sue doctors or those who participate in “producing an abortion for up to $10,000, mimicking the enforcement mechanism in Texas’s fetal heartbeat law” reports National Review.

Under the new law it is a felony offense to perform an abortion, “which will take effect in August unless a court challenge blocks it.”

 

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC