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Failures in pandemic education erased ‘decades of academic progress’

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It is not surprising that due to the pandemic, math and reading scores for 9-year-olds across the country declined. What is surprising, and devastating, is that those numbers between 2020 and 2022 didn’t just drop; they plummeted.

Decades of academic progress were erased. In two years, reading scores on a key national test dropped more sharply than they have in over 30 years, and math scores fell for the first time since the test began in the early 1970s.

“I was taken aback by the scope and the magnitude of the decline,” said Peggy Carr, who heads the National Center for Education Statistics, which administers the test. “The big takeaway is that there really are no increases in achievement in either of the subjects for any student group in this assessment — there were only declines or stagnant scores for the nation’s 9-year-olds.”

The scores come from a long-running version of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, a test known as “the nation’s report card.”  It is designed to compare student achievement across decades; the most recent scores were released Thursday.

“It’s clear that COVID-19 shocked American education and stunned the academic growth of this age group,” Carr told reporters on a Wednesday call. “No other factor could have had such a dramatic influence on student achievement in a relatively short period of time.”

Carr said while her team usually shies away from ascribing a reason to score increases or decreases, it’s obvious in this case that the disruptions wrought by the pandemic were a major factor in the declines.

The gap between higher- and lower-performing students was already growing before COVID hit, but federal officials say the pandemic appears to have exacerbated that divide.

“There is still a widening of the disparity between the top and the bottom performers, but in a different way,” Carr said. “Everyone is dropping. But the students at the bottom are dropping faster.”

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education

Sunny Hostin of ‘The View’ says people misinterpret his legacy; ‘he was a radical and wanted wealth redistribution’

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Screen Shot 2023 01 16 at 1.37.37 PM

‘The View’ host Sunny Hostin took advantage of the national Holiday Martin Luther King Day in order to bend the narrative to her agenda. “I think the biggest problem with Martin Luther King’s legacy is that people misinterpret his legacy. They misinterpret what he was asking for” she said.

Not to worry, Hostin believes she has the authority and intelligence to explain to decades of people what King was really wanting.

Hostin went on to say, “While we always hear ‘I want my little girls and boys to be judged by the content of their character rather not by the color of their skin’ that’s all you ever hear anyone saying.”

“But he was a radical, he was deeply invested in economic equality and he was deeply invested in making sure that Black people got reparations and that there was wealth distribution, wealth redistribution.”

 

 

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