Connect with us

Featured

Experts warn Iran could be behind the Florida water supply cyber-hack

Published

on

Screenshot 2020 03 10 08.31.30

Iran could be behind a recent cyber hack of a small town in Florida’s water supply that occurred last week, warned several intelligence and law enforcement officials who spoke to this reporter. The situation in the city of Oldsmar, Florida could have been far worse, according to Sheriff Bob Gualtieri of Pinellas County, who verified that the sodium hydroxide in the system was brought to extremely harmful and even deadly levels. The attack was conducted by a hacker remotely, he told reporters on Monday.

 “It’s a bad act. It’s a bad actor. It’s not just a little chlorine, or a little fluoride — you’re basically talking about lye,” Gualtieri said told reporters on Monday.

The small town hack, however, may have come from the world’s largest sponsor of terrorism: Iran. What’s more is that the regime was reportedly behind a similar attack on Israel’s water supply last year, per Fox News’ Trey Yingst. Its actions would certainly be an escalation in the regime’s rhetoric, which has threatened on multiple occasions to annihilate both the United States and Israel.

According to Dr. Rick Kiper, a retired FBI agent and computer forensic examiner, there’s a number of ways the intelligence community can trace such hacks to foreign sources. It is accomplished through what are known as “Indicators of Compromise” (IOCs).

“The Indicators of Compromise are basically pieces of digital evidence that reveal the tactics that hackers use to get into systems. Hackers, like the rest of us, can be kind of set in their ways,” Kiper told this reporter. “So even hackers have patterns that they use over and over again because they don’t want to reinvent the wheel each time. If they have a tactic that’s worked before, they’ll use it again.”

Another sign could be the IP addresses hackers use, he added, noting that the FBI has a public list of IOCs for Iran on the voting systems. For example, the hackers can use a technique called SQL injection to access a backend database of a website. Hackers can then use this to download website databases.

Iran has employed both such tactics, according to Kiper. “That’s basically what investigators are going to be looking for in order to identify who committed this intrusion – what actually happened and how do those actions actually match up to the known indicators of compromise,” he explained.

Sometimes, however, a hacker may use an IP address or a tactic that is associated with a completely different country in order to hide his identity. “They could put on the persona of either another hacker group or another particular hacker because there are Indicators of Compromise for specific groups, there’s Indicators of Compromise for countries, as well as for state actors, and then individuals.”

Kiper added, “However, we always like to say we catch the dumb ones, and a lot of times they won’t go through that effort, especially if they’re trying to get into a bunch of systems.”

One example of compromise, Kiper said, can be accomplished via remote access to SCADA, Supervisory control, and data acquisition systems that remotely manage utility equipment such as valves, electrical grids, etc.

“So a lot of utilities use a SCADA system because they don’t have to send workers out to turn valves and make direct connections, or actually to go read meters…. but of course, when you create convenience like that, you’re opening yourself up to security vulnerabilities and that’s exactly what happened.”

He concluded, “Indicators of Compromise are collected and shared. So if someone is hacked, they’re really encouraged to share exactly how they were compromised. But a lot of companies, they have shareholders, or they have maybe the chief information security officer, maybe his job is on the line and he really doesn’t want to put it out there publicly that they were hacked, but it really helps the entire community when people share that information.”

Foundation for Defense of Democracies Iran expert Behnam Ben Taleblu told this reporter Wednesday that the recent hack exposes a greater national security loophole that needs to be addressed by both sides of the political aisle.

“The recent hack of Florida’s water supply raises the issue of securing U.S. critical infrastructure from cyber and other malicious hacking activity,” Ben Taleblu said. “Securing American critical infrastructure should be a multi-year bipartisan policy proposition. In this regard, the best defense really is defense.”

He continued, “While Iran has not officially been proven to be the culprit, the clerical regime did attack Israel’s water supply in 2020 using cyber means. In the past, it has also attempted to hack American banks, casinos, and critical water-related infrastructure like dams.”

“Iran sees the cyber domain as one of several vectors to continue carrying out its strategic competition with adversaries. Doing damage to their critical infrastructure through cyber means is one way to land punches and not get caught. For a regime like Iran’s which also uses terrorism, these moves are consistent with its national security strategy. And that’s why it, if proven to be linked to Iran – will require a response.”

According to Israeli reporter Amichai Stein, Israel has joined the investigation into the Florida water supply hack and the Israel National Security Cyber Directorate “is in touch” with U.S. counterparts.

Thanks to local authorities, the poisonous water never actually made its way into local homes. However, the source of the hack is still being investigated.

The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office denied having any contact with Israeli officials over the hacking and suggested the FBI or U.S. Secret Service may have more information regarding the query, in a statement to this reporter.

A U.S. Secret Service and FBI both declined to comment.

Follow Jennie Taer on Twitter @JennieSTaer

You may like

Continue Reading

Featured

Cuomo says he’ll ‘fully cooperate’ with NY AG’s review of sexual harassment claims

Published

on

Screen Shot 2021 03 03 at 2.45.28 PM

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said Wednesday that he will “fully cooperate” with the state attorney general’s independent review into sexual harassment allegations made against the currently scandal-ridden governor, saying, “I fully support a woman’s right to come forward.”

Last Wednesday, Lindsey Boylan, who served in his administration for over three years, accused Cuomo of suggesting to her on a 2017 flight that they play strip poker, inappropriate touching, and kissing her on the lips without her consent.

RELATED: ‘Let’s play strip poker’: Fmr. Cuomo aide accuses NY governor of sexual harassment

Following Boylan’s accusations, 25-year-old Charlotte Bennett alleged the governor indicated interest in having an affair with her while she was serving in his administration as a health policy adviser. In a Saturday New York Times report, Bennett told the newspaper that Cuomo asked her if she had “ever been with an older man,” adding that “age doesn’t matter” in relationships.

At Wednesday’s press briefing, the Empire State governor addressed the accusations leveled against him over the past seven days by three women and New York Attorney General Letitia James’ (D) independent review into those claims, which she announced on Monday was formally proceeding.

RELATED: De Blasio ‘sickened’ by Cuomo sexual harassment claims

“As you probably know, the attorney general is doing an independent review, and I will fully cooperate with that review,” Cuomo said at the beginning of his statement. “Now, the lawyers say I shouldn’t say anything when you have a pending review until that review is over. I understand that, I’m a lawyer, too. But, I want New Yorkers to hear from me directly on this.”

“First, I fully support a woman’s right to come forward,” the governor began. “And I think it should be encouraged in every way. I now understand that I acted in a way that made people feel uncomfortable. It was unintentional and I truly and deeply apologize for it. I feel awful about it, and frankly I am embarrassed by it, and that’s not easy to say. But that’s the truth.”

This echoes what Cuomo said in a Sunday statement about the allegations, in which he stated he “may have been insensitive” during his tenure but charged his accusers of misinterpreting his actions, saying, “I acknowledge some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation… I am truly sorry about that.”

RELATED: Cuomo responds to sexual harassment claims, saying he ‘may have been insensitive’

During his Wednesday remarks, Cuomo iterated “I never touched anyone inappropriately,” repeated that sentence, then said “I never knew at the time that I was making anyone feel uncomfortable” and repeated that one too.

“And I certainly never, ever meant to offend anyone or hurt anyone or cause anyone any pain. That is the last thing I would ever want to do,” he continued. “I ask the people of this state to wait for the facts from the attorney general’s report before forming an opinion. Get the facts, please, before forming an opinion.”

“I also want you to know that I have learned from what has been an incredibly difficult situation for me as well as other people, and I’ve learned an important lesson,” the governor said at the end of his statement. “I’m sorry. I’m sorry for whatever pain I caused anyone, I never intended it, and I will be the better for this experience.”

Amid Boylan and Bennett’s allegations, another report of Cuomo sexually harassing a woman has cropped up. On Monday, a woman named Anna Ruch accused the governor of placing his hands on her cheeks—without her consent—at a 2019 wedding reception and asking if he could kiss her. A photograph of the two together at the event has also been circulating on social media.

RELATED: ‘Eat the whole sausage: Gov. Cuomo in hot water for resurfaced video

Asked at Wednesday’s briefing about the pictures that have resurfaced of him being touchy with people, particularly that of him and Ruch, the governor claimed that it is his way of greeting people.

“I understand the opinion of—and feelings of—Ms. Ruch,” Cuomo said. “You can find hundreds of pictures of me making the same gesture with hundreds of people—women, children, men, etc. You can go find hundreds of pictures of me kissing people. […] It is my usual and customary way of greeting.”

Moreover, the governor said that his father, former Gov. Mario Cuomo, would do the same thing.

“By the way, it was my father’s way of greeting people,” Cuomo said, explaining, “You’re the governor of the state, you want people to feel comfortable, you want to reach out to them.”

He also mentioned that he kisses and hugs legislators and noted that at an event in Queens the other day he hugged pastors and state assembly members.

Furthermore, the governor said that his intent “doesn’t matter,” saying, “What it matters is if anybody was offended by it.”

“But if they were offended by it, then it was wrong,” he added, going on to say that if they were offended or hurt by it, he apologizes.

MORE ON CUOMO: NY dem says state legislature is ‘inching toward’ Cuomo impeachment probe

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending