Connect with us

COVID-19

Expert Says ‘Very Premature’ to Close Colleges, ‘No Proof’ That Lockdowns Have Actually Helped COVID

Published

on

campus

Will it ever end? Biden says a ‘winter of death’ is coming, Fauci says wearing masks on planes will not go away, and businesses are going back to stricter work-from-home policies. “One medical expert suggests it’s ‘premature’ for U.S. colleges to be closing and announcing remote starts to the spring 2022 semester” reports Fox News.

Over the weekend, several colleges and universities announced decisions to shut down campuses due to growing fear over the latest omicron coronavirus variant. Thus far, the variant seems to be the least virulent and experts have called it a positive step towards being endemic, rather than a pandemic.

On Saturday, Harvard University said students will start the year off remotely for at least the first three weeks of January due to a “rapid rise” in coronavirus cases. “Other colleges such as Yale University and Penn State University haven’t announced a remote start to the spring 2022 semester but have told students t0 be prepared for a change if necessary” reports Fox News.

Fox News medical analyst and professor of medicine at New York University Langone Medical Center said it’s “very premature” for colleges to discuss plans to shift to remote learning for the spring 2022 semester.

Universities are already a “built-in quarantine situation” which allows for rapid testing and any additional measures such as providing booster vaccinations. “Since it’s a university, if you look at it completely medically, it’s a built-in quarantine situation,” Dr. Siegel said.

“What do you got at a university? The ability to quarantine people, the ability to study a whole population, the ability to rapidly test everyone, the ability to make sure everybody is vaccinated.” Dr. Siegel said there’s “no proof” that sending students back home decreases the spread of the coronavirus.

“There’s no proof whatsoever that lockdowns have actually helped COVID and that sending college students home from school decreases the spread of COVID. What do you mean they’re home? What do you think they’re doing? What are they doing? They are probably spreading it within their household, within their zip code. I’m not convinced that closing schools decreases national spread of this virus. Where’s the proof of that?,” Dr. Siegel questioned.

As many speculate, Dr. Siegel also thinks motivations behind closings are not simply medical, or “science” related. “In other words, what motivates a university to close? It’s probably a liability, right? That’s not a medical issue,” Dr. Siegel said. “They’re thinking of if we get too many cases and somebody’s kid gets sick, and we get blamed for it. But I think that that’s the mindset, pretty much.”

You may like

Continue Reading
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Stephane

    December 23, 2021 at 9:56 am

    How many people get a “cold” when the seasons change?
    How many colds can a person be infected with in a year?
    How many people die from a cold every year?
    HEY STUPID! DEMON RATS simply want to disturb every aspect of normal life for everybody in the world!
    And FAUX-XI wants his HITLERIAN TYRANNY to be followed. He wants to make money with the “””JABS”””!

  2. Coach Martin

    December 24, 2021 at 1:44 am

    Locking down education stops indoctrination. That is a great place to start.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

COVID-19

OH Judge halts Air Force from punishing airmen who sought religious exemption from vax mandate

Published

on

COVID Vaccine

A Judge of the Southern District of Ohio granted a preliminary injunction against the U.S. Air Force from punishing the servicemen and women who had filed for a religious exemption to the Biden administration’s vaccine mandate on Wednesday.

Judge Matthew W. McFarland, just two weeks before, ordered a restraining order against the Air Force from pursuing punitive measures against the airmen.

The case, Doster v. Kendall, McFarland wrote that the Air Force failed to raise any “persuasive arguments” for why the Court should not extend an existing Preliminary Injunction prohibiting the Air Force from punishing a group of plaintiffs to all airmen seeking religious exemption. He added:

[T]he Court reminds Defendants that ‘[i]t is emphatically the province and duty of the judicial department to say what the law is. Thus, due to the systematic nature of what the Court views as violations of Airmen’s constitutional rights to practice their religion as they please, the Court is well within its bounds to extend the existing preliminary injunction to all Class Members.

https://twitter.com/kristina_wong/status/1552456840285388800

All active-duty, active reserve, reserve, national guard, inductees, and appointees of the United States Air Force and Space Force, including but not limited to Air Force Academy Cadets, Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Cadets, Members of the Air Force Reserve Command, and any Airman who has sworn or affirmed the United States Uniformed Services Oath of Office or Enlistment and is currently under command and could be deployed, who: (i) submitted a religious accommodation request to the Air Force from the Air Force COVID-19 vaccination requirement, where the request was submitted or was pending, from September 1, 2021 to the present; (ii) were confirmed as having had a sincerely held religious belief substantially burdened by the Air Force’s COVID19 vaccination requirement by or through Air Force Chaplains; and (iii) either had their requested accommodation denied or have not had action on that request.

In addition, the order said the Air Force, which includes their officers, agents, servants, employees, and attorneys, and other people acting in concert or participation with them, who receive notice of this preliminary injunction, are PRELIMINARILY ENJOINED from:

(i) taking, furthering, or continuing any disciplinary or separation measures against the members of the Class for their refusal to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, while keeping in place the current temporary exemption; such disciplinary or separation measures include, but are not limited to, ‘adverse administrative actions, non-judicial punishment, administrative demotions, administrative discharges, and courts-martial’ for the benefit of Defendants, this includes continuing any administrative separation or punitive processes or initiating the same.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC