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Expected head of Afghanistan’s new government is Taliban co-founder Baradar

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According to sources on this inside, Taliban co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar is set to lead the new Afghan government. A source spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity.

“All the top leaders have arrived in Kabul, where preparations are in final stages to announce the new government,” a Taliban official told the news organization.

Reportedly Baradar will also be joined by Mullah Mohammad Yaqoob, who is the son of the late Mullah Omar. Omar is another Taliban co-founder. The last time the Taliban was in power was in 1996. As a result of U.S. military occupying Afghanistan in 2001, they lost their seats in the government.

Now British Foreign Minister Dominic Raab announced he will not recognize Baradar as leader. Raab said so when he landed in Pakistan Friday.

“The approach we’re taking is that we don’t recognize the Taliban as a government,” Raab said.

Meanwhile, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki assured reporters a week ago that the United States would likewise not recognize a Taliban government.

“I want to be really clear: there’s no rush to recognition of any sort by the United States or any international partners we have talked to,” Psaki told reporters then.

Read the full article here.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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Healthcare

Biden supports ‘exception’ to filibuster to ‘codify Roe v. Wade in the law’

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Breaking Thursday, President Joe Biden gave his support to amend or drop the filibuster rule in order to restore perceived abortion rights lost following the Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade on Friday.

While at the NATO summit in Spain, Biden said “The most important thing to be clear about is I believe we have to codify Roe v. Wade in the law, and the way to do that is to make sure the Congress votes to do that.”

“And if the filibuster gets in the way, it’s like voting rights, it should be we provide an exception for this, requiring an exception to the filibuster for this action to deal with the Supreme Court decision,” Biden added.

A filibuster requires 60 votes, and The Hill writes “There are not 50 senators who support changing the rules around the filibuster, however, making Biden’s suggestion unlikely to go anywhere.”

 

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