Connect with us

Nation

Elon Musk Says Microchips Will be Ready to Implant Human Brains in 2022

Published

on

Elon Musk

Elon Musk hopes to be able to implant microchips into human brains as early as next year. Unfortunately, next year is later than he had originally hoped. Neuralink, the brain-interface technology, was co-founded by Musk in 2016.

Neuralink has been developing “a chip that would be implanted in people’s brains to simultaneously record and stimulate brain activity. It’s intended to have medical applications, such as treating serious spinal-cord injuries and neurological disorders” reports Business Insider.

Musk said the first recipients to receive the chips will be people with severe spinal cord, pending FDA approval. When discussing Neuralink during a live-streamed interview at The Wall Street Journal’s CEO Council Summit on Monday, Musk stated, “Neuralink’s working well in monkeys, and we’re actually doing just a lot of testing and just confirming that it’s very safe and reliable, and the Neuralink device can be removed safely.”

The billionaire added that Neuralink’s “standards for implanting the device are substantially higher than what the FDA requires.” Business Insider writes that Musk has a history of “over-promising and under-delivering on project timelines.”

In 2019 Musk hoped Neuralink could begin human testing by the end of 2020. In February of this year, he stated implants could start in humans by the end of 2021. On Twitter, however, he reiterated his belief that 2022 will in fact be when implanting can begin.

“Progress will accelerate when we have devices in humans (hard to have nuanced conversations with monkeys) next year” Musk tweeted Monday evening.

In April, Neuralink released a video showing a monkey playing a video game using one of its devices. “After raising $205 million in July, Neuralink said it would channel the funds towards developing its chip so it could allow quadriplegics to control digital devices with their minds” reports Business Insider.

You may like

Continue Reading
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Daniel

    December 8, 2021 at 5:39 pm

    That’s too bad. Normally I’d be first in line. Except this is today and I put this in the Covid vaccine class. Through my dead cold hands you will.

  2. doug

    December 8, 2021 at 8:41 pm

    the mark of the beast will be placed on the forehead or the hand. Not in the brain. Shiny objects.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Nation

Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

Published

on

supply chain

The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC