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Elon Musk Calls Elizabeth Warren ‘Senator Karen’ in Taxes Twitter Feud

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Elizabeth Warren
Elizabeth Warren

Billionaire Elon Musk handed Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) the most epic insult as the two were feuding over taxes. Musk referred to the progressive senator as “Senator Karen” in a pretty wonderful Twitter thread.

On Monday Elon Musk was announced as TIME Magazine’s “Person of the Year.” Senator Warren did not congratulate Musk, but rather, took to Twitter to demand he pay more taxes. “Let’s change the rigged tax code so The Person of the Year will actually pay taxes and stop freeloading off everyone else” she tweeted alongside a Boston Globe article about the TIME announcement.

Short but sweet, Musk responded “Stop projecting!” with a link to a Fox News article discussing how “Sen. Elizabeth Warren repeatedly and deliberately sought to benefit in her personal, academic and employment life by posing as a Native American.”

Musk added a few more digs, continuing the thread with “you remind me of when I was a kid and my friend’s angry Mom would just randomly yell at everyone for no reason.” Not done yet, Musk added one final tweet, “Please don’t call the manager on me, Senator Karen.”

According to Forbes, Musk is the world’s wealthiest man with a net worth of $252 billion. “The spat comes as Warren and other DC Democrats mull wealth taxes and other measures that could potentially put Musk, Jeff Bezos and Mark Zuckerberg on the hook for billions of dollars by taxing their unrealized gains” reports The Post.

Musk has a history of taking jabs at progressive Democrats on Twitter. The Post put together a few:

In November, Oregon Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden reiterated his support for a wealth tax for billionaires on Twitter.

“Why does ur pp look like u just came?” responded Musk in apparent reference to the senator’s profile photo.

Musk also attacked Sen. Bernie Sanders that same month after the Vermont independent expressed support for raising taxes on billionaires.

“I keep forgetting that you’re still alive,” replied Musk.

“Want me to sell more stock, Bernie? Just say the word …” the mogul added in reference to the billions of dollars of Tesla shares he has sold this year to cover tax bills.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Leland Kendrick md

    December 15, 2021 at 9:36 pm

    Warren is a has been never was
    Dumb as rock
    Does anybody really care what warren thinks

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Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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supply chain

The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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