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Election Results: When will Arizona’s ballots be counted by?

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The unprecedented surge in absentee and mail-in ballots this election means that we won’t learn the full results likely for weeks after Election Day. But when will we know the full results by? A better question, rather, is when will each of the swing states’ full results be known by.

On Tuesday, I tackled the ballot situation in Pennsylvania, a contentious swing state which prohibits the counting of any ballots before the morning of Election Day. Arizona, on the other end of the policy spectrum, began counting ballots on Tuesday.

Check out this explanation about the difference between mail-in and absentee ballots here by Ben Wilson: The Difference Between Absentee and Mail-In Ballots.

RELATED: Election Results: When will Pennsylvania’s ballots be counted by?

Arizona, once Republican-red like its sunsets, has turned purple in recent years—like the sky at dusk. The Grand Canyon State now finds itself center stage in the most contentious presidential election in recent history, meaning that its results could be critical in deciding the winner of the election, the results of which have an outsized chance of being disputed this year.

Lucky for Arizona, the state has been a trailblazer when it comes to early voting. Due to their impressive system that they’ve built up over the decades, a majority of the state’s votes may be known on the night of November 3, assuming nothing derails the voting and counting process.

During the 2018 midterms, 79% of votes in the state were cast early, and that was before they allowed early ballots to be tallied before Election Day. They enacted that change after 2018 when it had taken a week to tally all the votes.

Along with new ballot-counting machines in Arizona’s most populous county, Maricopa, votes this year are expected to be counted quite speedily. Local officials estimate that most of the results will be known by the end of Election Night, the New York Times reported. And, because the state’s seven million residents are overwhelmingly concentrated around Phoenix, where Maricopa is situated, the county comprises 60% of Arizona’s total population. Second place to Maricopa is Pima County, where Tucson is.

The Arizona Secretary of State will release the unofficial preliminary results at 8pm (Mountain Time), NBC News 12 Phoenix reports, but won’t be published until they’ve been verified.

As of Tuesday, since early voting began on October 7, election officials across the state have already received hundreds of thousands of early ballots, says News 12.

Pima County reports in its ballot turnover receipts that it has counted 156,459 ballots alone so far. Topping Pima, Maricopa has verified the signatures of over 600,000 received ballots, its department of elections tweeted.

At this rate, unless some unexpected political “haboob” strikes, Arizona’s results will be reported far sooner than many other states and sooner than most swing states.

Despite Las Vegas falling just over the border in neighboring Nevada, one could safely bet—relatively speaking—that most of Arizona’s results will be revealed on Election Night.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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There is ‘repeated evidence’ of non-citizens voting

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There is “repeated evidence” of non-citizens voting, Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX) said during an appearance on Breitbart News Daily, discussing the Safeguard American Voter Eligibility (SAVE) Act.

“Let me just say this about the overall state of the election issue,” Roy began, explaining that “we’ve got repeated evidence of those who are here illegally — or, or whether they’re here legally — but non-citizens voting.”

“We’ve got studies demonstrating that. We’ve got evidence that it may have tipped the election for Al Franken and his election back in Minnesota. Objective studies have showed…Virginia tossing out 1,500 registered voters just last year. I can go through a laundry list. We’ve got local jurisdictions — Oakland, San Francisco, our nation’s capital in Washington, DC, and New York City — who are registering voters specifically for their state and local elections, but we know that they don’t work hard to make sure they’re not voting in federal elections,” he said, noting that “federal law prohibits [and] limits the ability of states to be able to check and ensure citizenship, so much so that the state of Arizona has to run two systems — one for their state local elections and one for their federal elections.”

“They’re literally bifurcated because they want to ensure citizenship for their state and local elections, but they’re not allowed to for federal elections. Therefore, we need to fix the problem,” he said.

Breitbart News adds:

Further, Roy said, because of the Motor Voter Act — the National Voter Registration Act — passed in the 1990s, the courts have interpreted federal laws to limit the state’s ability to “determine and collect the information necessary for determining and checking citizenship.”

Essentially, Roy said the U.S. has set up a system that requires federal agencies to push out the forms, encouraging individuals to register to vote. And while they ask one to identify if they are a citizen, and while federal law requires one to be a citizen to vote in federal elections, the congressman said there is nothing there to actually check citizenship.

The SAVE Act would help address these issues and correct what Roy described as the “glitch,” making it so every state would require anyone applying to register to vote to prove their citizenship.

“By doing that, though, it is correcting the glitch. It also goes through and it addresses some of the issues that have been complicated. There are states, for example, like North Dakota, which does not have voter registration at all, okay? So they can just show up to vote and don’t have registration…They have their own rules there about what you have to present in order just to vote. And that’s obviously a less populated state than, say, California or Texas or New York or Florida. But, so, we adapt and try to adjust to help with those kinds of situations. But, overall, the purpose of the bill is exactly as you just described, pretty simple,” Roy said. This is a bipartisan issue with massive support.

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