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Disney’s progressive ‘Strange World’ cartoon flops with disastrous $18M opening on a $180M budget

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Disney’s attempt to push the woke agenda in children’s entertainment has royally flopped at the box office. “Strange World” features a gay teen as the main character and follows his romance; there is an environmental message as well.

Opening weekend sales came in well below projections, grossing a mere $11.9 million over the three-day weekend and $18.6 million over the five-day Thanksgiving holiday.

The Wrap called the movie a “historic bomb” due to its $180 million reported budget. Variety projected that the flick could lose as much as $100 million.

The Washington Times reports “the movie centers on a family of explorers embarking on a journey to save their planet from a mysterious environmental crisis, but ‘tries too hard to earn the diversity merit badge,’ as the MovieWeb review says.”

Not only is Disney attempting to impose propaganda on youth, but it has zero bravery in doing so. In countries where there is virtually zero acceptance and tolerance for homosexuality, Disney opted to skip out. According to CartoonBrew20, Disney did not release in international markets including China and the Middle East.

The Washington Times reports:

The film’s poor reception contributed to the perception of wokeness-run-amok at Disney, which was criticized for the lesbian kiss scene in “Lightyear,” a $200 million animated feature released in June that has grossed $115 million domestically, according to BombReport.

Last week, Disney rehired Bob Iger to replace CEO Bob Chapek, who landed the company in a feud with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis over the state law barring instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity in grades K-3.

 

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education

Harvard Reinstates Standardized Testing Requirement for Admissions

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Harvard University announcement it will reverse its test-optional policy and reinstate standardized testing as a requirement for admission. The move has stirred a contentious debate within the academic community. Effective for applicants seeking entry in the fall of 2025, Harvard College will mandate the submission of either SAT or ACT scores, with limited exceptions for circumstances hindering access to these exams.

Hoekstra contends that standardized tests provide crucial predictive insights into a student’s potential for success in higher education and beyond. By reinstating the testing requirement, Harvard seeks to gather more comprehensive data, particularly beneficial for identifying talent across diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.

Proponents of the move, like Harvard Kennedy School’s political economy professor David J. Deming, emphasize the universality of standardized tests, arguing that they offer a level playing field for all applicants. Deming underscores the accessibility of these tests compared to other metrics like personal essays, which may favor privileged students with greater resources.

However, the decision has sparked criticism from those who argue that standardized tests perpetuate inequities in admissions. Critics point to studies, such as those conducted by Harvard economists Raj Chetty and others, which highlight disparities in access to advanced courses and extracurricular opportunities among students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The controversy surrounding Harvard’s policy shift reflects broader concerns within higher education about equity, diversity, and inclusion. While standardized testing may offer a standardized measure of academic aptitude, it also raises questions about its ability to accurately assess a student’s potential in light of systemic educational disparities.

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