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Dark Wire: US Court Denies Ex-Nazi Concentration Camp Guard’s Appeal, Upholds Deportation Order

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This story was first published on TheDarkWire.com. Click here to read the original report.

The Department of Justice’s Office of Special Investigations was charged with “Nazi-hunting” in 1979 after it became known that many Nazis had left Europe to escape trial in the United States after World War II.

As time went on, however, the division found living witnesses and evidence to be even more scarce. Despite this, the DOJ and OSI have still made it possible to “hunt” down those who contributed to the killing of 11 million people, including 6 million Jews.

The DOJ is still able to fulfill its commitment in 2020 and on Thursday it announced a court’s decision to uphold an order to deport a Tennessee man who once served as a Nazi guard after his attempt to appeal the Court’s decision was denied.

Friedrich Karl Berger, who was ordered to be removed from the country on February 28, served as an S.S. Guard in 1945 in Germany’s Neuengamme Concentration Camp system, where Jews, Poles, Russians, Danes, Dutch, Latvians, French, Italians, and political opponents were imprisoned and killed.

“Berger’s willing service as an armed guard at a Nazi concentration camp cannot be erased and will not be ignored,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. 

Rabbitt added, “On the eve of tomorrow’s75th anniversary of the commencement of the Nuremberg trials of the surviving leaders of the defeated Nazi regime, this case shows that the passage of time will not deter the department from fulfilling the moral imperative of seeking justice for the victims of their heinous crimes.”

In the trial earlier this year, the Memphis court found that Meppen prisoners were put in “atrocious” conditions and were worked “to the point of exhaustion and death.” 

“War criminals and violators of human rights will not be allowed to evade justice and find safe haven here,”-Deputy Assistant Director Louis A. Rodi III of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) National Security Investigations Division

Judge Rebecca L. Holt ruled in the earlier trial that deportation was justified under the 1978 Holtzman Amendment to the Immigration and Nationality Act for Berger’s “willing service as an armed guard of prisoners at a concentration camp where persecution took place.” Moreover, Berger admitted before the court “that he never requested a transfer from concentration camp guard service” and that he still receives a pension from the German government for “his wartime service.”

Berger was part of the Nazi’s effort in March 1945 to ‘forcibly evacuate’ Neuengamme’s main concentration camp as allied forces were advancing towards it. That mass evacuation caused nearly 70 prisoners to die in a two-week period, as noted in the decision.

The British charged the head of Meppen SS Obersturmführer Hans Griem in 1946 for “ill-treatment and murder of Allied nationals,” but Griem escaped before his trial, leaving only some of his coconspirators to be tried and convicted of war crimes in 1947, according to the DOJ.

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Immigration

IG Audit shows nonprofit wasted $17 million taxpayer dollars on hotels to not house illegal foreign nationals

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An audit report by the Inspector General shows enraging information as to exactly how millions of dollars from the American people were completely wasted.

One doesn’t need to read past the IG report’s headline to become furious: “ICE Spent Funds on Unused Beds, Missed COVID-19 Protocols and Detention Standards while Housing Migrant Families in Hotels.”

In summary, an unbelievable $17 million was wasted on not housing illegal foreign nationals. At the heart of the story is Endeavors, a nonprofit which has received half a billion dollars in taxpayer money “through no-bid government contracts to house foreign nationals who illegally entered the U.S. and were released by the Biden administration instead of being deported” reports The Center Square.

The audit evaluated the process used by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to grant no bid contracts to Endeavors and their compliance with federal law, the article explains.

The report evaluated an $86.9 million sole source contract first awarded to Endeavors earlier this year. The contract was awarded for six months to provide “temporary shelter and processing services for families who have not been expelled and are therefore placed in immigration proceedings for their removal from the United States,” The Center Square previously reported.

Months after it received its first no bid contract, Endeavors received a second $530 million contract and hired former Biden administration official Andrew Lorenzen-Straight as its senior director for migrant services and federal affairs, Axios reported.

The Center Square explains:

Sole source contracts are used when an agency can demonstrate the contract meets specific and justified criteria. If contracts don’t meet one of the criteria, they must be awarded through an open competitive process.

Endeavors has no professional history of providing housing services and has never provided beds or all-inclusive emergency family residential services, OIG auditors found. Those critical of DHS’ contract process argue the agency should be awarding contracts through an open competitive process to ensure that those bidding for funds can offer the services they claim they can provide.

Under the contract in question, for six months between March and September 2021, Endeavors was responsible for providing 1,239 beds and other necessary services in hotels. It used six hotels and repurposed them as Emergency Family Reception Sites to accommodate families staying less than three days while ICE considered conditions of release, including alternatives to detention.

The IOG made four recommendations for ICE to improve its contracting and oversight of hotel facility management and operations. “ICE concurred with one recommendation and didn’t concur with three. Based on information ICE provided in its response, the IOG said it considered one recommendation resolved and closed, and three recommendations administratively closed.”

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