Connect with us

Healthcare

Cuomo Receives Award For ‘Inspired Leadership’ During Covid-19: Critics Question His Achievements

Published

on

Screenshot 2020 03 10 14.31.09

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo received the “Edward M. Kennedy Institute Award for Inspired Leadership” during the Covid-19 pandemic. Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker will also receive the same award.

“I am honored to receive the 2020 Edward M. Kennedy Institute Award for Inspired Leadership,” tweeted Gov. Cuomo. “I learned about humanity, leadership and putting people first from the great Senator Ted Kennedy.” Guomo congratulated his fellow recipient Gov. Charlie Baker for the award.

Cuomo also received an Emmy Award for the viral press conferences he held in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic.

But not everyone is happy with how the NY Governor has handled the virus in the state. As of December 7th, there have been 7,147 reported Covid-19 deaths in Nursing and Adult Care facilities throughout the state. Many of these critics associate Cuomo’s directive to take in Covid-19 patients back in March with thousands of deaths in nursing homes.

“Leadership is about good and sound judgment. Gov. Cuomo exercised misguided leadership. He’s responsible for this nursing home problem, and the deaths are on his hands,” Michael Caputo, assistant secretary for public affairs at the US Department of Health and Human Services, told The New York Post back in May.

Between March 25 and May 8, approximately 6,326 COVID-positive patients were admitted to nursing homes, according to a state health department report.

Despite all the critics none of these claims have ever been proven.

Click image to read in full Gov. Cuomo advisory on admissions to nursing homes:

Screen Shot 2020 12 13 at 10.06.56 AM

You may like

Continue Reading

Healthcare

TN Republican introduces legislation to fight opioid shipments into U.S.

Published

on

Fentanyl 1031234188 scaled

Tennessee Republican Representative Diana Harshbarger is attempting to fight the opioid crisis and epidemic through new legislation. Introduced Friday, Harshbarger told the Daily Caller:

The Daily Caller first obtained a copy of the legislation, which addresses what Harshbarger calls a “loophole.” The legislation amends the Controlled Substances Act to specifically require registrants to investigate reports of suspicious orders of controlled substances and halt them if necessary. Under the version of the act currently in force, drug manufacturers and distributors are only required to report suspicious orders of opioids and other controlled substances to the DEA.

“Breaking the opioid epidemic’s stranglehold on our nation is one of my foremost priorities. In an effort to do so, my colleagues and I have identified a loophole that allows distributors to continue order fulfillment, even under suspicious circumstances.”

“My bill closes that loophole with the requirements and guardrails needed to ensure these addictive and potentially dangerous drugs do not fall into the wrong hands while the DEA investigates. The future of our nation depends on us solving the addiction crisis, and this is a step towards that outcome” Harshbarger continued.

The Daily Caller reports:

According to a congressional report released in September, the opioid crisis cost the U.S. $1.5 trillion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CDC says 93,331 people died from overdoses in the U.S. in 2020, the highest in 50 years. Opioid-related deaths made up nearly three-quarters of the total.

Pharmaceutical companies have been blamed for contributing to the opioid epidemic. The Department of Justice is currently suing the pharmaceutical company AmerisourceBergen over allegations the company failed to report suspicious orders of opioids to federal law enforcement.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement
-->

Trending Now

Advertisement
-->

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC