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Convicted felon faces backlash and resigns from TX county mail-in ballot review board

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Former Hidalgo County commissioner Sylvia Handy has faced backlash for her post on a local mail-in ballot review committee after it was reported that she’s a convicted felon and she’s since resigned from her position over the scrutiny, The McAllen, Texas Monitor is reporting.

Handy’s appointment to the Signature Verification Committee drew scrutiny from both the local Republican and Democrat parties. However, the leadership of the local Democratic party argued that she was appointed because there was a shortage of willing volunteers.

“Ms. Handy has resigned her appointment effective immediately,” Hidalgo County Democratic Party Chairwoman Norma Ramirez said during a local news Facebook livestream , according to the report.

Handy served time in a federal prison after she plead guilty to charges of mishandling taxpayer money, the report noted.

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Oklahoma passes bill banning majority of abortions from ‘moment of fertilization’

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Oklahoma’s Republican Governor Kevin Stitt signed a bill into law on Wednesday which bans virtually all abortions “from the moment of fertilization.”

“I promised Oklahomans that as governor I would sign every piece of pro-life legislation that came across my desk and I am proud to keep that promise today. From the moment life begins at conception is when we have a responsibility as human beings to do everything we can to protect that baby’s life and the life of the mother,” Stitt said in a statement. “That is what I believe and that is what the majority of Oklahomans believe.”

The state legislature first approved the bill, which goes into effect immediately, last week. It bans abortions from the moment of fertilization, except for in cases where rape or incest occurred, or where the mother’s life is in danger.

The law also allows for private citizens to sue doctors or those who participate in “producing an abortion for up to $10,000, mimicking the enforcement mechanism in Texas’s fetal heartbeat law” reports National Review.

Under the new law it is a felony offense to perform an abortion, “which will take effect in August unless a court challenge blocks it.”

 

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