Connect with us

Healthcare

CNN Has Slammed the Usage of Hydroxychloroquine for Months — Until it Reversed Course In An Early Morning Tweet

Published

on

After months of claiming hydroxychloroquine is linked to a “greater risk of death” and “doesn’t work,” CNN admitted — at 4 am on the Friday before a holiday — that the drug is linked to significantly higher survival rates in hospitals.

The quietly-announced new study by the Henry Ford Health System in Michigan questions the months of anti-hydroxychloroquine coverage showing that of the 2,541 patients observed, 26 percent of patients not given the drug died, compared to 13 percent of those who did receive hydroxychloroquine.

The research — which is “surprising” according to CNN — was a multi-center retrospective observational study. The full results found that “overall crude mortality rates were 18.1% in the entire cohort, 13.5% in the hydroxychloroquine alone group, 20.1% among those receiving hydroxychloroquine + azithromycin, 22.4% among the azithromycin alone group, and 26.4% for neither drug,” according to the team’s study.

The controversial anti-malaria drug, often touted by President Donald Trump as a potentially effective remedy for COVID-19, was mocked by CNN and other news agencies since mid-March when President Trump began pushing it — and admitting he takes it daily. The Washington Post claimed it was a “false hope” and the Philadelphia Inquirer said it was “the most disappointing, disavowed drug that researchers keep studying for COVID-19.”

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1241367239900778501?s=20

CNN wrote in it’s middle-of-the-night discovery that “it’s a surprising finding because several other studies have found no benefit from hydroxychloroquine, a drug originally developed to treat and prevent malaria.”

“President Donald Trump touted the drug heavily, but later studies found not only did patients not do better if they got the drug, they were more likely to suffer cardiac side effects,” CNN said in this morning’s article.

CEO of the Henry Ford Medical Group Dr. Steven Kalkanis, said “It’s important to note that in the right settings, this potentially could be a lifesaver for patients.”

Dr. Marcus Zervos, division head of infectious disease for Henry Ford Health System, said in a news conference that “our results do differ from some other studies.” He noted an important factor is beginning treatment early.

“For hydroxychloroquine to have a benefit, it needs to begin before the patients begin to suffer some of the severe immune reactions that patients can have with Covid,” Zervos told the press.

Peter Navarro, the White House trade adviser, told CNN that “this is a big deal.”

“This medicine can literally save tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of American lives and maybe millions of people worldwide,” Navarro said.

With this study shattering previous thought and talking points, perhaps a treatment or highly effective remedy can soon become available — with politics aside.

You may like

Continue Reading

Healthcare

NY Gov Hochul issues executive order: Polio ‘an official diisaster’

Published

on

GettyImages 1207839451

New York Democrat Governor Kathy Hochul on Friday issued an executive order that Polio is now considered an official disaster. 

“On polio, we simply cannot roll the dice,” said Dr. Mary T. Bassett, New York State Health Commissioner. “If you or your child are unvaccinated or not up-to-date with vaccinations, the risk of paralytic disease is real. I urge New Yorkers to not accept any risk at all.”

The virus that causes polio has been found in the wastewater of more than one county, according to state health officials. “A sewage sample from Nassau County collected in August tested positive for poliovirus, following the prior detection of the virus in wastewater samples in Rockland County, Orange County, Sullivan County and New York City, further indicating that the virus is spreading in the area to some degree” reports The Wall Street Journal.

“The Nassau County sample was also genetically linked to the single confirmed case of paralytic polio that had been identified this summer in a young adult resident in Rockland County who was unvaccinated.”

Hochul’s executive order has been issued through Oct. 9, and expands the network of providers able to administer polio vaccinations to “include emergency-medical-services workers, midwives and pharmacists.”

The new order makes providers send polio-immunization data to the New York State Department of Health in order to better help health officials “focus vaccination efforts on areas of low uptake.”

New York state health officials have sent out alerts to providers, have hung fliers “in houses of worship, grocery stores and summer camps and talked with community leaders about boosting vaccination rates this summer.”

The Wall Street Journal Reports:

The poliovirus spreads mostly when a person touches their mouth after coming in contact with an infected person’s feces. Most infected people don’t develop any symptoms but can still spread the virus, a major concern for health officials, and around a quarter develop flulike symptoms. Those who are vaccinated are at low risk, health officials have said, as getting three doses of the polio vaccine administered in the U.S. is at least 99% effective at preventing paralytic disease.

Health officials, however, also said that certain New Yorkers who are fully vaccinated but at high-risk should receive a single lifetime booster. That applies to individuals who will or might have close contact with a suspected or confirmed polio patient, as well as healthcare workers in those areas who might handle poliovirus samples or treat patients who might have polio…

Two forms of the virus can cause paralysis, one of them being the wild poliovirus found in nature. The case in New York, on the other hand, is caused by vaccine-derived poliovirus, a mutated form of a strain used in an oral polio vaccine…

The oral polio vaccine, used in many parts of the world outside of the U.S., relies on a weakened, live form of the virus that recently inoculated children shed in their feces. In places with lower vaccine uptake, the weakened virus can sometimes circulate and mutate to become more like the wild virus and potentially paralyze people who are not fully vaccinated.

 

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC