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CNN Has Slammed the Usage of Hydroxychloroquine for Months — Until it Reversed Course In An Early Morning Tweet

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After months of claiming hydroxychloroquine is linked to a “greater risk of death” and “doesn’t work,” CNN admitted — at 4 am on the Friday before a holiday — that the drug is linked to significantly higher survival rates in hospitals.

The quietly-announced new study by the Henry Ford Health System in Michigan questions the months of anti-hydroxychloroquine coverage showing that of the 2,541 patients observed, 26 percent of patients not given the drug died, compared to 13 percent of those who did receive hydroxychloroquine.

The research — which is “surprising” according to CNN — was a multi-center retrospective observational study. The full results found that “overall crude mortality rates were 18.1% in the entire cohort, 13.5% in the hydroxychloroquine alone group, 20.1% among those receiving hydroxychloroquine + azithromycin, 22.4% among the azithromycin alone group, and 26.4% for neither drug,” according to the team’s study.

The controversial anti-malaria drug, often touted by President Donald Trump as a potentially effective remedy for COVID-19, was mocked by CNN and other news agencies since mid-March when President Trump began pushing it — and admitting he takes it daily. The Washington Post claimed it was a “false hope” and the Philadelphia Inquirer said it was “the most disappointing, disavowed drug that researchers keep studying for COVID-19.”

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1241367239900778501?s=20

CNN wrote in it’s middle-of-the-night discovery that “it’s a surprising finding because several other studies have found no benefit from hydroxychloroquine, a drug originally developed to treat and prevent malaria.”

“President Donald Trump touted the drug heavily, but later studies found not only did patients not do better if they got the drug, they were more likely to suffer cardiac side effects,” CNN said in this morning’s article.

CEO of the Henry Ford Medical Group Dr. Steven Kalkanis, said “It’s important to note that in the right settings, this potentially could be a lifesaver for patients.”

Dr. Marcus Zervos, division head of infectious disease for Henry Ford Health System, said in a news conference that “our results do differ from some other studies.” He noted an important factor is beginning treatment early.

“For hydroxychloroquine to have a benefit, it needs to begin before the patients begin to suffer some of the severe immune reactions that patients can have with Covid,” Zervos told the press.

Peter Navarro, the White House trade adviser, told CNN that “this is a big deal.”

“This medicine can literally save tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of American lives and maybe millions of people worldwide,” Navarro said.

With this study shattering previous thought and talking points, perhaps a treatment or highly effective remedy can soon become available — with politics aside.

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College to begin offering abortion pill on campus

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Barnard College, a partner campus of Columbia University, will be rolling out a plan in May that involves supplying students with abortion pills, the Columbia Spectator reported. The plan to provide the abortion service in the form of mifepristone abortion pills to students was initially announced in the fall of 2022 after the overturning of Roe. V Wade, according to the Spectator. However, the rollout’s delay has been partially attributed to an August 2023 grant the college received, which allowed Barnard to join a large network of primary care providers that will help steer the college through the procedures.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reports Barnard’s Primary Care Health Service will host student focus groups in upcoming weeks to find out student perspectives about the service and to identify new ways to support students considering abortion. “We wanted to make sure that we’re addressing this from every angle that will be supportive of students,” Sarah Ann Anderson-Burnett, director of Medical Services and Quality Improvement of Barnard, told the Spectator. Anderson-Burnett also said it has expanded the availability of its abortion providers to after-hours and year-round.

Barnard has six medical professionals, including two physicians and four nurse practitioners, who are capable of performing the procedure, Mariana Catallozzi, vice president for Health and Wellness and chief health officer of Barnard, told the Spectator. The school also launched a partnership with AccessNurse, a medical call center that will assist with patient concerns related to abortions.

“The training doesn’t end with the clinicians,” Anderson-Burnett told the Spectator. “Clinicians are trained on the actual provision, but there’s also an overall training that will be provided to key partners and stakeholders across the campus because we want every step, every touchpoint, to be supportive and to be trauma-informed and to be patient-valued and centered but also respect confidentiality and privacy.”

The University of Massachusetts Amherst spent more than $650,000 to stock abortion pills in March 2023 at the request of Democratic Maryland Gov. Maura Healey. Democratic New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a bill in May 2023 forcing college in the state to stock abortion pills on campus.

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