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CNBC correspondent advocates wearing three masks, citing researchers

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After Dr. Anthony Fauci came out and said Monday morning that it’s “common sense” that wearing two masks “likely would be more effective” than just a single one, CNBC’s Contessa Brewer, citing researchers, claimed that people should wear three masks.

While appearing on CNBC’s “The News with Shepard Smith” Monday evening, Brewer suggested that people should wear three masks to help protect themselves from those who aren’t wearing masks properly or at all.

“The experts keep telling us that wearing masks is really about protecting others from ourselves in the event that we are contagious, but you know if other people aren’t wearing their masks or they’re wearing them improperly, we need to protect ourselves,” said Brewer.

“So experts say you can double up with a tight weave fabric mask for added protection,” she said while putting on two masks, then going on to cite researchers from Virginia Tech who said that three masks is more effective than two.

“Now, Virginia Tech researchers found that doubling up these cloth masks increases the efficiency from 50% to 75%,” Brewer continued. “A three-layer mask could block up to 90% of the particles.”

At the end of the segment, after Brewer emphasized that one’s mask needs to fit on properly to work, host Shepard Smith added that people should also get rid of facial hair due to it possibly getting in the way of properly wearing a face mask.

In an article published last week, CBS4 Medical Editor Dr. Dave Hnida told Summit News that “three masks may be going too far since that could interfere with the ability to breathe,” while saying that two masks is “something you may want to consider” doing.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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