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COVID-19

Celebs party like it’s pre-pandemic at Super Bowl, no masks in sight

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If you watched the star-studded Super Bowl attendance in Los Angeles Sunday night, you might think you were watching a pre-pandemic game. Not a single celebrity seemed to even have a mask anywhere in site. What one certainly would not think is that the game is taking place in a state which proudly declares itself in a “state of emergency.”

As the sleuths of the internet picked up, Ellen DeGeneres and her wife were enjoying the game maskless. If you attend Ellen’s show in the audience, however, attendees are all given masks to wear. Saying the left is hypocritical is just beating a dead horse. We already know this.

Conservative host Clay Travis tweeted “Here’s the video of every celebrity without a mask during the Super Bowl. But every kid in California will have to be wearing them tomorrow in school. They must all be holding their breaths the entire game.”

“Hollywood stars who have been vocal in their support for mask mandates were content not to wear them, sparking widespread anger on Twitter” reports the Daily Mail, which noted that California’s mask mandate still states: “Masks are required for all individuals in all indoor public settings, regardless of vaccination status from December 15, 2021 through February 15, 2022.”

California’s rules will not change until tomorrow, Tuesday, and will make only unvaccinated people wear face masks in indoor public settings. Among the maskless high-profile celebrities were Kendall Jenner, Hailey and Justin Bieber, Matt Damon, Charlize Theron, Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck.

Daily Mail added that even with Tuesday’s new rules, “the guidance states: ‘Fully vaccinated individuals are recommended to continue indoor masking when the risk may be high’ – as in a crowd, like on Sunday night” where 70,000 people gathered at Los Angeles’ SoFi Stadium.

See all the hypocritical celebrities here: Daily Mail

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. lu mahalo

    February 14, 2022 at 5:56 pm

    “Ellen DeGeneres and her wife…” What’s wrong with this picture?

  2. K Misek

    February 14, 2022 at 7:59 pm

    Rules for thee, but not for me. Hollywood, home to actors with rattlesnake tongue and fangs. The ones who rattle and hiss the loudest have the biggest deception to hide. Sounds like the DC’s brood of vipers.

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COVID-19

Watchdog: Pentagon likely rushed denials of COVID-19 vaccine Religious Exemption requests

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The Army only approved just 24 religious COVID-19 vaccine exemption requests out of a total 8,514 requests submitted by active duty soldiers, and  1,602 requests have been rejected while the rest remain pending.

Military.com obtained information showing the Pentagon rushed vaccine exemption denials:

Sean O’Donnell, the Pentagon’s inspector general, wrote in a June 2 memo to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin obtained by Military.com calling attention to a “concerning” trend in which military brass rushed to reject vaccine-exemption petitions rather than giving each request due consideration.

“We found a trend of generalized assessments rather than the individualized assessment that is required by Federal law and DoD and Military Service policies,” he said. “Some of the appellate decisions included documentation that demonstrated a greater consideration of facts and circumstances involved in a request.”

In March, a Texas judge blocked the Navy from dismissing sailors with pending exemption requests and in August, a Florida federal judge ordered class action relief and granted an injunction barring the federal government from enforcing the vaccine mandate for the Marine Corps.

National Review writes, “For the last year, military has been struggling with a recruitment problem. As of July, with only three months left in the fiscal year, the Army had met only 40 percent of its recruitment goal and reduced its active-duty force by 12,000 troops.”

O’Donnell calculated that officials likely gave each appeal a cursory glance rather than a thorough examination, possibly opening the door to litigation from service members who had to resign after they failed to obtain exemptions. Across all the branches, there were about 50 denials per day in a 90-day period, he determined. Over a thousand Coast Guardsmen have already tried to launch a class-action lawsuit in response to their being refused religious exemptions, the publication noted.

“The volume and rate at which decisions were made to deny requests is concerning,” the memo read. “Assuming a 10-hour work day with no breaks or attention to other matters, the average review period was about 12 minutes for each package. Such a review period seems insufficient to process each request in an individualized manner and still perform the duties required of their position.”

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