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CBP Officers Seize Over 103 Pounds of Heroin, Fentanyl Pills at AZ-Mexico Border

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On Wednesday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized over 103 pounds of heroin and fentanyl pills at the Port of Nogales on the Arizona-Mexico border, according to a Thursday CBP press release.

The drugs, estimated to be worth $1 million, were discovered under the floor compartment of a 21-year-old U.S. citizen’s sedan Wednesday morning when he was attempting to enter the United States.

When he attempted to enter the U.S. through the checkpoint, CBP officers requested that the vehicle receive an additional inspection. During the more thorough secondary inspection of the sedan, officers discovered 68 drug packages under the floor compartment. Of the drugs seized, 102 pounds were heroin and 1.5 pounds were fentanyl, the CBP determined.

“Federal law allows officers to charge individuals by complaint, a method that allows the filing of charges for criminal activity without inferring guilt,” the press release clarifies. It adds that: “An individual is presumed innocent unless and until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.”

After the inspection, the officers seized the narcotics and sedan, arrested the man, and then gave him to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations.

Over the past few years, the opioid epidemic has been garnering more attention as it wreaks havoc on many communities throughout the U.S. According to data 2018 data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, an average of 128 people die from opioid overdoses every day.

The opioid epidemic is responsible for taking thousands of American lives each year and potent synthetic opioid drugs like fentanyl can cause overdoses in small amounts. Sara A. Carter produced the film “Not in Vein” in 2018 to highlight the dangerous trafficking of those drugs. Click here to watch the film.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Alec Baldwin Lowest of the Low; Blames Victim For Shooting ‘Everything is at her Direction’

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“Just when you think Alec Baldwin can’t go any lower, he blames Halyna Hutchins, the woman he shot to death, for getting shot to death” writes the New York Post. Naturally, Baldwin gifted his first interview since the tragic death of Hutchins to his Hampton’s buddy and leftwing media host George Stephanopoulos.

“Everything is at her direction,” Baldwin told George Stephanopoulos during the hourlong interview that aired Thursday night on ABC. Ultimately the entire one hour can be summed up by Baldwin’s twelve words: “Someone is responsible for what happened, and I know it’s not me.”

For any viewers looking for anything particularly meaningful from Baldwin or for him to answer tough questions, a sit-down with his liberal elite buddy was not the place to get it. “I’m holding the gun where she told me to hold it,” Baldwin said, “which ended up right below her armpit. Which is what I was told — I don’t know.”

He carried on, “I would never point a gun at anyone, and pull the trigger at them. Never.” Oddly he had just finished describing how he was pointing the gun at Hutchins.
Agent Bobby Chacon, a retired FBI agent who works as a writer and on-set consultant for Hollywood stated “The bullet striking and killing that woman came out of the barrel of the gun pointed directly at her…Bullets don’t curve. He isn’t in ‘The Matrix.’ The trigger would still have to be pulled.”

The New York Post reports:

“I’m not aware of any gun firing itself,” says Steve Wolf, a Hollywood firearms and special-effects expert since 1994. “I’ve never seen a gun self-discharge. A single-action revolver like this” — the Colt that Baldwin fired — “can be discharged very easily, with minimal input required … The trigger still must have been pressed.”
Wolf is also outraged by a larger concern. “It’s really important to discredit anyone who claims that guns fire themselves,” he says. “If this becomes an acceptable defense, there goes any accountability when it comes to shooting people. We can’t have this kind of ‘guns shoot themselves’ thing. They don’t.”

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