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Cancel Culture Fail: Fundraiser to Buy Goya Products for Food Pantries Flies Past $250,000

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In 2020 everyone and everything seems at risk of getting canceled. Old tweets may take down a politician, a distasteful text exchange can hurt a public figure — and patriotism can hurt… beans and rice?

The household staple, Goya Foods, has been in hot water with those upset about CEO Robert Unanue’s words of praise for President Donald Trump at an event at the White House last week.

“We’re all truly blessed at the same time to have a leader like President Trump, who is a builder,” Unanue said at the signing ceremony of an executive order on the White House Hispanic Prosperity Initiative — the goal is to increase access to better school and economic opportunities for Hispanic citizens.

After the comments were made at the White House, a boycott of the products, ranging from rice to sardines, was promptly declared online by the left. Trump supporters, however, formed their own plan: a “buy-cott.”

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1283370156341760001?s=20

In no time, the products were widely purchased at stores across the nation. One buyer, Casey Harper, created a Go Fund Me to purchase the products and distribute them to food pantries.

“What if we rise up to say no to cancel culture AND feed the hungry at the same time,” the original post said. Harper detailed his experience of going to a local store and spending over $200 on Goya products to donate. His fundraiser blew up.

As of July 15 — a mere three days after the crowd-funding page went live — 7,200 people have donated and over $256,000 has been raised.

Many of the donations are small, some, however, are for as much as $5,000.

“We are also planning to buy directly from GOYA because of the unexpectedly large volume,” Harper wrote in a recent update where he said he’s meeting with a Goya executive to plan the purchases. “We expect to begin purchasing as soon as possible, and will have video and pictures of the process so everyone can see the results.”

The funds will be used to purchase Goya products from both the company itself and from local grocery stores. Because of the huge response, Harper said some of the funds will be sent to food pantries outside of his area, metro Washington D.C.

To donate or learn more about the fundraiser: click here.

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Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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supply chain

The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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