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CA’s STRINGENT COVID-19 holiday compliance laws. Sing quietly and more…

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Gavin Newsom California Governor

If you’re wondering if you still live in the home of the free and the land of the brave, I applaud you. Why? Because that means you’re questioning what it is happening in our nation since the outbreak of COVID-19.

If you aren’t paying attention – or just don’t care to know what is happening then you are part of the problem. Why? Because the guidelines for COVID-19 in many Democratic run states are frankly, un-American and directly contradict our Constitution.

Gatherings that include more than 3 households are prohibited...Gatherings are defined as social situations that bring together people from different households at the same time in a single space or place. 

California department of public health

Check out California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s rules for the holidays in the time of COVID-19 and tell me that this isn’t weird and un-American.

In fact, the summary of the compliance guidelines established by the California Department of Public Health is really revealing.

“This guidance provides an updated plan for Californians to gather outside their household and replaces the prior gatherings guidance issued on September 12, 2020 and March 16, 2020,” states the compliance regulation guidelines. “It applies to private gatherings, and all other gatherings not covered by existing sector guidance are prohibited. Gatherings are defined as social situations that bring together people from different households at the same time in a single space or place.  When people from different households mix, this increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19.”

I could list every ridiculous rule here but all you need to do is go here to the California Public Health website.

I did pick a few of my favorites to share with you.

Here’s one I’d like to see how California will enforce: “Gatherings that include more than 3 households are prohibited. This includes everyone present, including hosts and guests. Remember, the smaller the number of people, the safer.

People who are singing or chanting are strongly encouraged to do so quietly (at or below the volume of a normal speaking voice).

California Covid-19 rules for public behavior, welcome to 1984

 Newsom’s Rules for Singing, Chanting, and Shouting at Outdoor Gatherings

  • Singing, chanting, shouting, and physical exertion significantly increases the risk of COVID-19 transmission because these activities increase the release of respiratory droplets and fine aerosols into the air. Because of this, singing, chanting, and shouting are strongly discouraged, but if they occur, the following rules and recommendations apply:
    • All people who are singing or chanting should wear a face covering at all times while singing or chanting, including anyone who is leading a song or chant. Because these activities pose a very high risk of COVID-19 transmission, face coverings are essential to reduce the spread of respiratory droplets and fine aerosols;
    • People who are singing, shouting, chanting, or exercising are strongly encouraged to maintain physical distancing beyond 6 feet to further reduce risk.
    • People who are singing or chanting are strongly encouraged to do so quietly (at or below the volume of a normal speaking voice).
  • Instrumental music is allowed as long as the musicians maintain at least 6-foot physical distancing. Musicians must be from one of the three households.  Playing of wind instruments (any instrument played by the mouth, such as a trumpet or clarinet) is strongly discouraged. 

You can follow Sara A Carter on Twitter @SaraCarterDC

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College to begin offering abortion pill on campus

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School desk

Barnard College, a partner campus of Columbia University, will be rolling out a plan in May that involves supplying students with abortion pills, the Columbia Spectator reported. The plan to provide the abortion service in the form of mifepristone abortion pills to students was initially announced in the fall of 2022 after the overturning of Roe. V Wade, according to the Spectator. However, the rollout’s delay has been partially attributed to an August 2023 grant the college received, which allowed Barnard to join a large network of primary care providers that will help steer the college through the procedures.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reports Barnard’s Primary Care Health Service will host student focus groups in upcoming weeks to find out student perspectives about the service and to identify new ways to support students considering abortion. “We wanted to make sure that we’re addressing this from every angle that will be supportive of students,” Sarah Ann Anderson-Burnett, director of Medical Services and Quality Improvement of Barnard, told the Spectator. Anderson-Burnett also said it has expanded the availability of its abortion providers to after-hours and year-round.

Barnard has six medical professionals, including two physicians and four nurse practitioners, who are capable of performing the procedure, Mariana Catallozzi, vice president for Health and Wellness and chief health officer of Barnard, told the Spectator. The school also launched a partnership with AccessNurse, a medical call center that will assist with patient concerns related to abortions.

“The training doesn’t end with the clinicians,” Anderson-Burnett told the Spectator. “Clinicians are trained on the actual provision, but there’s also an overall training that will be provided to key partners and stakeholders across the campus because we want every step, every touchpoint, to be supportive and to be trauma-informed and to be patient-valued and centered but also respect confidentiality and privacy.”

The University of Massachusetts Amherst spent more than $650,000 to stock abortion pills in March 2023 at the request of Democratic Maryland Gov. Maura Healey. Democratic New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a bill in May 2023 forcing college in the state to stock abortion pills on campus.

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