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California medical schools under investigation by Department of Education for racial segregation

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The Department of Education is stepping in to investigate California university medical schools for racial discrimination surrounding their programming and scholarships. The investigation comes after “Mark Perry of Do No Harm, a nonprofit fighting against the progressive capture of medicine, filed a federal civil-rights complaint alleging that the schools violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race by academic programs that receive federal funding” reports National Review. 

What drew ire is the program at the U diversity of California-San Francisco School of Medicine’s Racial Affinity Caucusing Groups.” The program is racially segregating and was piloted by the Pediatrics and Internal Medicine departments over the past two years.

The program “recognizes that the work that Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) are doing to process, heal, and dismantle racism is different from the work that white people need to do,” according to the school’s website.

Behaving as the literal definition of segregation, separate sessions are held for students who identify as black or African American, as white, and as people of color.

“It’s like an apartheid sort of approach to medical education,” Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, chairman of Do No Harm said of the San Francisco case. When he attended University of Pennsylvania Medical School many years ago, his colleagues fought against separating the black students, Goldfarb claimed. “Now they push for these spaces to fight racism when they’re the ones acting it out,” he said.

“These positions are being given to minority applicants over white applicants. There are people who will not be able to pursue careers as dermatologists because they won’t be able to get training in those fields,” Goldfarb added. “If you don’t get into a residency you won’t be a surgeon.”

National Review notes UCSF did not respond to a request for comment and similarly, the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine is under investigation for offering a $2,000 award that has race-based eligibility restrictions.

“The Keck school’s Diversity in Medicine Visiting Clerkship Award is only open to fourth-year applicants who are from racial/ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine. Students who identify as black/African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander are eligible, according to the school website.”

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education

Hispanic Democrats ban term ‘Latinx’ used ‘to appease white rich progressives’

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Lawmakers in Connecticut which are both Hispanic and Democrats, have proposed a new state law to ban the term “Latinx” from all government documents. The term is deemed offensive by the lawmakers who want to end the practice.

“I’m of Puerto Rican descent and I find it offensive,” Democratic state representative Geraldo Reyes told the Associated Press.

“The Spanish language, which is centuries old, defaults to Latino for everybody,” Reyes added. “It’s all-inclusive. They didn’t need to create a word, it already exists.”

Reyes is the bill’s chief sponsor, and was joined by four other Hispanic Democrats who are also members of then Black and Puerto Rican Caucus in the Connecticut Legislature.

The Connecticut lawmakers are not alone in their sentiment. In 2021, Democratic Representative Ruben Gallego of Arizona tweeted “When Latino politicos use the term it is largely to appease white rich progressives who think that is the term we use.” Gallego added that his office was not allowed to use the term in any official communications.  

National Review reports:

The same year, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the oldest community organization in the United States, declared it would no longer use Latinx. The term has also been rejected by Real Academia Española, a governing body that oversees the Spanish language.

While the term has been enthusiastically adopted by progressive academics and far-left activists, polling reveals it has not gained traction within the broader Hispanic population.

“The word Latino is incredibly exclusionary, both for women and for non-gender conforming people,” Maia Gil’adi, a professor at Boston University, told the AP. “And the term Latinx is really useful because of the way it challenges those conceptions.”

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