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California bans gas-powered lawnmowers and leaf blowers, opting to be zero emission by 2024

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By 2024, California plans to effectively ban the sale of gas-powered lawnmowers and leaf blowers. Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law Saturday. Portable gas-powered generators must also be zero emission by 2028 according to the new law.

The Los Angeles Times spoke to the law’s author, assemblyman Marc Berman (D-Menlo Park). “It’s amazing how people react when they learn how much this equipment pollutes, and how much smog-forming and climate-changing emissions that small off-road engine equipment creates,” Berman told the Times. “This is a pretty modest approach to trying to limit the massive amounts of pollution that this equipment emits, not to mention the health impact on the workers who are using it constantly.”

Then, Berman logged onto Twitter to troll opponents to the law. “This equipment is dangerous to the workers who use it, disruptive to communities, and terribly damaging to our climate,” he tweeted. “MAGA Twitter is losing their ever-loving minds over this. I thought they’d all moved over to Parler?”

Now the state set aside $30 million to towards the transition from gas-powered equipment to zero-emission equipment. However, reporter Phil Wonton points out that it will require 30-40 batteries to get a day’s work done.

Read the full article here.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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White House Strangles Hydrogen Industry Growth with Overreaching Tax Credit Restrictions

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In a move that could stifle innovation and economic growth, the White House, Treasury Department, and Department of Energy jointly released guidance on Friday morning, imposing stringent restrictions on hydrogen power development eligible for federal tax credits. The proposed guidance, tied to the 2022 Inflation Reduction Act’s highest production credit of $3 per kilogram of hydrogen, is seen by critics as an attempt to align with green energy standards at the expense of economic considerations.

According to reports from Fox News, opposition to the restrictions comes from business and clean power industry groups, arguing that the measures could deter investment, increase hydrogen costs, and unfairly discriminate against existing low-carbon power sources. Critics view the move as a departure from the market-driven approach that encourages growth and innovation.

Moreover, despite the administration’s claims that the hydrogen tax credit will foster a cleaner industry, skeptics point to potential economic ramifications. John Podesta, President Biden’s clean energy czar, and Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm have lauded the move as a step towards global clean energy leadership, but critics argue that such measures risk stifling job creation and economic opportunity.

The proposed regulations, with a 10-year availability for tax credits ranging from $0.60 to $3 per kilogram, raise concerns about government overreach in dictating industry standards. Critics argue that the administration’s insistence on strict regulations could hinder the hydrogen industry’s ability to provide meaningful alternatives for hard-to-decarbonize sectors and reach competitive market prices.

As opposition mounts from industry groups and Senate Democrats, who advocate for a more gradual approach, the clash over hydrogen tax credits underscores the ongoing struggle to balance environmental objectives with economic considerations in the clean energy sector.

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